Stop enforcing speed limiting device on commercial drivers, NURTW tells FRSC

National Union of Road Transport Workers (NURTW), has advised the Federal Road Safety Corps (FRSC) to adopt the generally preferred spider technology system, which was designed to curb accident by tracking over-speeding, instead of speed limiting device.

The union stated that the enforcement of speed limiting device would put men of the FRSC on collision course with commercial drivers.

This was contained in a communiqué issued shortly after a meeting by the central working committee/national executive council at the NURTW Zone 2 Headquarters, Osogbo, Osun State.

The communiqué was signed by Alhaji Najeem Usman Yasin and Mr Clement Wetkur, president and general-secretary, respectively.

It will be recalled that the FRSC commenced the enforcement of installation of the device on commercial vehicles on February 1, but the NURTW said the enforcement had been making life unbearable for commercial drivers

The union cautioned that attempt to enforce the device on motorists would, apart from compounding the already bad traffic situation in the highways, also create conflicts between FRSC officials and members of the union.

The union members disagreed with the FRSC, on its position that the device was introduced as a panacea to incessant road traffic accident.

The communiqué read: “We are urging FRSC to adopt spider technology system instead of speed limiting device. We believe that factors that can make smooth and accident free on our roads includes good road, vehicles and state of mind of the driver. If the speed limiting device could prevent over-speeding, accident could still occur if the road is bad or if the driver is not focused.”

The union appealed to the FRSC to stop enforcing the device on commercial drivers, adding that doing so will bring more hardship on their members.

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