Archbishop Tutu acted as potent voice against apartheid system, says CAN

The leadership of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN) has commiserated with the government and the people of South Africa on the death of Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

CAN, in a statement signed by its President, Reverend Samson Ayokunle, said Tutu was a South African Anglican archbishopp and theologian known for his work as an anti-apartheid and human rights activist.

“We thank God for a life well spent by His great servant who used every given opportunity to speak a potent voice against the defunct apartheid system of racial segregation and white minority rule in South Africa.

“The revered Tutu was a South African Anglican archbishop and theologian, known for his work as an anti-apartheid and human rights activist. He was also the first African bishop of Johannesburg from 1985 to 1986 and then Archbishop of Cape Town from 1986 to 1996.

“He was also known as a theologian who sought to fuse the Black Theology with African Theology.

“We recalled with nostalgia when from 1978 to 1985, Tutu was the General Secretary of the South African Council of Churches. That was when he emerged as one of the most prominent opponents of South Africa’s apartheid system of racial segregation and white minority rule.

“Although an activist, yet he was an advocate of non-violent protest and foreign economic pressure to bring about universal suffrage. In 1986, he became the Archbishop of Cape Town, the most senior position in southern Africa’s Anglican hierarchy. In this position, he emphasised a consensus-building model of leadership and oversaw the introduction of female priests.

“Tutu played prominent roles that led to the release of the foremost anti-apartheid activist Nelson Mandela from prison in 1990 and they both led the negotiations that ended apartheid and introduce multi-racial democracy.”

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