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NIP decries poor performance in SSCE Physics

As Winners emerge in National Physics Competition

THE National Institute of Physics (NIP), last week, described the performance of students in Physics at the senior school certificate level as “abysmal”.

This was part of the observations made by participants at the 39th Annual Conference of the Institute held at Crawford University, Igbesa, Ogun State.

In his remarks, the President of the Institute, Professor David Iliya Malgwi, said it was troubling that in spite of the importance of Physics in society, adequate attention had not been given to the teaching and learning of the subject at the secondary school level.

“I want to emphasise once again that without a good knowledge of Physics, we cannot have engineers, technologists, doctors, pharmacists, nurses, surveyors, geoscientists\oil and gas workers, archeologists, astronauts, pilots, air traffic controllers, among others. The earth we occupy and the entire universe run according to the laws and theories of Physics.

“In spite of this stark reality, our young school leavers continue to perform abysmally in their SSCE results in Physics from both WAEC and NECO. This is indeed a very serious problem in our hands and if we do not tackle it now, our satellite launchings and nuclear energy projects may run into very serious difficulties in future due to the imminent dearth of knowledgeable physicists, other scientists and engineers.”

The Vice Chancellor of Crawford University, and a Fellow of the Institute, Professor Isaac Rotimi Ajayi, in his own speech, urged government at all levels to invest massively in research.

“In developed economies, you see government funding research, year after year without necessarily getting any breakthrough. But then, when the breakthrough comes, it would pay for all the years when those investments looking like throwing away money.”

Four students who emerged finalists in the annual National Physics Quiz Competition organised by the Institute were at the event awarded cash prizes.

While the First Prize was won by Tungbulu Preye, the Second Prize went to Uzoma Stephen Uzoma. Olugbenga Ibrahim won the Third Prize, while Amina Yahaya received the consolation prize.