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I had no hand in Kudirat Abiola’s assassination – Al-Mustapha

Former Chief Security Officer (CSO) to the Military Head of State, late General Sanni Abacha, Major Hamza Al-Mustapha, on Wednesday, broke his silence over the assassination of the wife of the acclaimed winner of June 12, 1993 presidential election, Kudirat Abiola.

Al-Mustapha while speaking in Akure, the Ondo State capital, during the sixth edition of Dr. Fredrick Fasehun annual public lecture, said some cabals within the Abacha government used the opportunity to soil his image and personality.

According to Al-Mustapha, those behind the assassination used him to cover up for their atrocities after the death of Abacha, saying he never participated or had any hand in the killing of the 1993 presidential election winner, Abiola.

The former CSO who said he was often misrepresented by people, said he gave his best while in service “to protect the Head of State, protect the government and the people of the country,” noting that “anything aside from that would have made him a traitor.”

The former CSO said the response became imperative at the lecture following the allegation against him by the guest lecturer of the event, Dare Babarinsa, who stated that Al-Mustapha imprisoned the former Secretary to the Government of the Federation (SGF),Olu Falae and Frederick Fasehun in the same prison during the military junta.

“I was never a traitor, I am not a traitor and will never be a traitor,” Al-Mustapha stated, urging all Nigerians to come together as one regardless of their creed, political differences for a better Nigeria.

Assessing the nation’s democracy, he said, “There is so much turbulence, greed and selfishness. We take two steps forward, four steps backward.  My concern is patriotism and true love for the country. Our desire is to invest and allow our institutions to stay, rather than forcing them into decay.

“That is what we should be cautious about. Those in leadership and those being led particularly those who have attained statesmanship position.

“They should understand there is heavier responsibility on their shoulder and they should realize that this country is too important to be allowed to fail. We must support all those in power.”

Speaking on the anti-corruption war of the Muhammadu Buhari-led Federal Government, Al- Mustapha said, “The anti-corruption war is not easy as it being said. We saw it in the past administrations. But before you start the anti-corruption war itself, there are measures to take.

“One to heal the wounds, two; corruption has eaten deep so it is going to be a combination of many things, moral law, scientific and force. The law should be seen to be enforced, ensuring the right of man and those who are enforcing it should also realize that the right of man must be respected.

“And to those who are stealing should realize law is hot water, if you dare put your hand in hot water, you will get it burnt and when it is burnt you have no one to blame. This is where we are and this must be done.”

Dare Babarinsa, in his lecture with the theme: ‘Nigeria’s Quest for Social Justice and Credible Leadership, the Travail of a Nation on Trial,’ lamented that the leaders, whom he said enjoyed the dividends of democracy in their days, have failed to provide same to the succeeding generation.

He identified education, population and infrastructure as the major focus of government at all levels if there would be social justice and credible leadership that would ultimately better the lives of the people.

He said “The most pressing challenge is directly with us: it is not corruption; it is not Boko Haram; it is not the Niger Deltans; it is the uncontrolled and galloping population of Nigeria.”

He expressed the fears that by 2040, on veritable authority, the government will have to cater for over 400 million people, projecting big uncertainty for security and development.

He suggested that there should be solid population control and more effective education policy, enjoining the Federal Government to put off infrastructure on sale and outright concession.