IPOB: Nnamdi Kanu’s lawyer, Ejiofor speaks from hiding, says Police responsible for attack

Ifeanyi Ejiofor, the lawyer to the leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB), Nnamdi Kanu, has broken silence on the invasion of his residence by men of the Anambra State Police Command.

Recall that in the early hours of Monday, when a combined team of police and military officers invaded Ejiofor’s residence in Oraifite, Anambra State, killed four persons including two police officers dead.

Several others were injured in the ensuing clash between the Police and the residents.

Following the incident, the police which claimed IPOB members were responsible for the attack and for the death of the two police officers who were burnt to death, declared Ejiofor wanted.

Ejiofor, however, released a video on Facebook on Tuesday with the claim that some police officers took away the corpses of those killed and burnt them somewhere.

He added that his mother was gunned down and was presently receiving treatment at the hospital.

ALSO READ: ASUU: AGF is frustrated over IPPIS enrollment failure

Narrating the incident, Ejiofor said: “On Sunday being the first day of December 2019, I was called at about 8 pm to 9 pm by the DPO and he never passed any message to me.

“Then in the morning, at about 6 am, I got a call from my elder brother that police have invaded my premises, led by the area commander himself and one of my wards who participated in a local conflict was arrested. The area commander demanded to see me and I said I will be back around 10:30 in the morning. I told him I will come to see him at the station when I am back.

“When I came back around 10, I told my mother I want to go see the area commander, but on a second thought, I decided to go see my uncle who will accompany me.

“We were on our way to the commander’s office taking an unconventional way when I got a call from my junior brother that the police were in my house and they opened fire on all living object, including persons in my house.”

He further called on international organisations, stressing that he has been a target for defending IPOB members in court, despite maintaining more than 17 years of unbroken relationship with the police hierarchy.

He said: “The police could have left me an invitation letter, and even if I refused to show up, they know how to get me.”

Comments