Wondrous World of Women – Tribune Online https://tribuneonlineng.com Breaking News in Nigeria Today Wed, 12 Jun 2019 19:02:44 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.1 https://tribuneonlineng.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/logo.jpg Wondrous World of Women – Tribune Online https://tribuneonlineng.com 32 32 118125416 Eliminating widowhood rites that violate women’s dignity https://tribuneonlineng.com/218208/ Thu, 13 Jun 2019 01:58:23 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=218208 Tribune Online
Eliminating widowhood rites that violate women’s dignity

widow

Culture according to the Centre for Advance Research on Language is  shared patterns of behaviours and interactions, cognitive constructs and understanding that are learned by socialisation. Culture includes religion, food, wear, dressing, language, marriage, music, greetings, sitting, love, what we believe is right or wrong, and a whole lot  of other things like widowhood practices […]

Eliminating widowhood rites that violate women’s dignity
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Eliminating widowhood rites that violate women’s dignity

widow

Culture according to the Centre for Advance Research on Language is  shared patterns of behaviours and interactions, cognitive constructs and understanding that are learned by socialisation. Culture includes religion, food, wear, dressing, language, marriage, music, greetings, sitting, love, what we believe is right or wrong, and a whole lot  of other things like widowhood practices and rites. Culture is an individualistic, man-made concept of collective identity that is open to complete subjectivity. The fact that so many ‘cultures’ exist with some contradicting others is evidence that it’s based on or influenced by personal feelings, tastes, or opinions that grew overtime which can be modified, improved, replaced or removed.

Nigeria is made up of over 300 ethics groups with over 520 languages all having different cultural practices in widowhood.  While widows in the Northern Nigerian seem to have better stories to share in their widowhood, especially as regards to rites, with the various ethnic groups of the South, discussion can only be addressed with the degree varying not absence of.

Among the widowhood practices and rites which a woman at the death of her husband will be made to undergo, which unfortunately are still very much prevalent in most of ethnic groups are:  She is made to shave her hair, pubic and armpit.

She is made to cry at midnight and by graveside

She is made to drink water  washed from his body to prove her innocence.

She is made to go to the forest at midnight to bath.

She is made to cook and have the last supper with husband’s corpse.

She is made to eat with same plate unwashed for days often plastic plates so to be burnt because she’s termed unclean as everything she touches is unclean.

She is ostracised or force to be ostracised from family in her refusal of one obnoxious act or the  other

She is made to do more than this as her culture demands in her grieve.

As if these are not enough, a new one is about to emerge; which is throwing of the ring into his grave.

The time has come for all these practices and rites to be outlawed,  especially now that it is obvious to us that not performing them will not bring any evil as proclaimed in the olden days, seeing that the rich and powerful go without the rites and nothing happens to them other than getting richer with a mental wellness to raise their kids while the poor are stripped of their dignity which attacks their psychological well being leaving them to struggle to raise their kids with an unbalanced mental health.

When a widow I interviewed narrated a story of her ordeal of widowhood including being asked to shave her pubic hair in this 21st century from the same city where another influential widow walked away after the burial of her husband, I wept at man’s great injustice to man.

Today widows go to burial with paid security men in uniform only to disappear from her home immediately the corpse of the husband is lowered to the grave as she and her children automatically get ostracised.

The loss of one’s husband is enough trauma for a woman and her children. If there are enough empirical evidence confirming she killed her husband; the wrath of the law should take its course.  Other than that, the addition of these rites and practices are coercion, an emotional rape by culture and human rights violations to the highest order.

This action forces her to lose her dignity or lose her family; either ways her emotional wellness is dwarfed including that of her children. I must say that to continue our sharing of rice, clothes and envelope and the various skill acquisitions programme empowerment for widows without addressing the issues of our culture that promotes segregation, victimisation and exploitation, we cannot continue to pray with her while ignoring her pain. We must visit the basis. If the rape of culture is not eliminated, all we are doing in empowering widow is peripheral.

In celebration of International Widows Day 2019 join Almanah Hope Foundation as we say “end every widowhood rites that violates women dignity”. Our organisation is in the process of drafting the bill that will be submitted to National Assembly for enactment as soon as the 9th Assembly is inaugurated, join us and let’s begin the process of bridging gender gap by eliminating the violence against women in widowhood.

Hope Nwakwesi is the founder of Almanah Hope Foundation

Eliminating widowhood rites that violate women’s dignity
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Aliyu leads Nigeria to 11th World Chambers Congress in Rio https://tribuneonlineng.com/217953/ Wed, 12 Jun 2019 02:53:12 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=217953 Tribune Online
Aliyu leads Nigeria to 11th World Chambers Congress in Rio

commerce

The National President of Nigeria Association of Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mines and Agriculture (NACCIMA), Hajiya Saratu Iya Aliyu will lead a delegation from various chambers of commerce and industry in Nigeria to the 11th World Chambers Congress (11 WCC) in Rio de Janeiro,Brazil from June 12-14  2019. The 11th Congress will open up Nigeria’s […]

Aliyu leads Nigeria to 11th World Chambers Congress in Rio
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Aliyu leads Nigeria to 11th World Chambers Congress in Rio

commerce

The National President of Nigeria Association of Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mines and Agriculture (NACCIMA), Hajiya Saratu Iya Aliyu will lead a delegation from various chambers of commerce and industry in Nigeria to the 11th World Chambers Congress (11 WCC) in Rio de Janeiro,Brazil from June 12-14  2019.

The 11th Congress will open up Nigeria’s organised private sector to trade promotion and investment opportunities, facilitate and strengthen relations from diverse attending companies, countries and regions and a platform to exchange real-world ideas and best practices on chamber and business activities.

The 11th Congress will also witness the World Chambers Competition; the only award programme of its kind to recognise pioneering projects undertaken by chambers from around the world. Nigeria and other 15 chambers of commerce out of 74 submissions will move to the final round of the World Chambers Competition. Representing 11 countries, the selected chambers will each have the opportunity to present their innovative initiatives to the global network of chambers attending the 11th WCC.

Nigeria is the only African chamber shortlisted to the final round for the “Best Education and Training Project” category through Abuja Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI). Aliyu thanked ACCI for representing Africa and making Nigeria proud. “ We are proud of ACCI achievements and will be happy to share our experience, learn and exchange ideas on investing in education and training as antidote to economic development and job creation through small-and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in RIO”

The 11th World Chambers Congress is the largest international gathering of the globe’s most prominent leaders and brightest minds in transforming the future of chambers of commerce and their business members.

Aliyu leads Nigeria to 11th World Chambers Congress in Rio
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We are promoting culture in rural, urban ways —Seraphina Nwankwo of Imisi Gallery https://tribuneonlineng.com/217950/ Wed, 12 Jun 2019 02:53:01 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=217950 Tribune Online
We are promoting culture in rural, urban ways —Seraphina Nwankwo of Imisi Gallery

colour

Seraphina Nwankwo, a graduate of Educational Planning and Management from South America University affiliated with Joint Professional Training and Support (JPTS), is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Imisi Gallery. In this interview with TAYO GESINDE, she speaks about her foray into the world of tie and dye and what she hopes to achieve with her designs.

We are promoting culture in rural, urban ways —Seraphina Nwankwo of Imisi Gallery
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We are promoting culture in rural, urban ways —Seraphina Nwankwo of Imisi Gallery

colour

Background

I am the first of the family of six. I have three siblings, two boys and a girl.  I was born into a Christian family. My parents,  Mr. and Mrs. Nwankwo, are both entrepreneurs and I think I took after them in that regard. We are Igbo.

 

When and how did you get into the tie and dye business?

Right from my childhood, I loved culture and artistic works but I didn’t study anything that has to do with that. However, when   the opportunity came, I registered for the training.  After the training, I decided to go into the business. It has been two years since I started the business.

 

How did you come about the name Imisi?

That is actually the name I intend to give my child.  Imisi means Inspiration. All our designs and colours are God inspired and that is why our slogan is “Coat of many colours.” This was as a result of the fact that all the different colours we have, all have their biblical meanings and they contribute to our personalities. For instance, everyone knows that the colour blue stands for love and peace but the biblical meaning of this colour is the presence of God. It also means the word of God and authority. And that is why the sky is blue. Colour Yellow to many people means to be  cheerful or be  optimistic but biblically it is associated with purging and trials. That is where we have the Holy Spirit coming in. Ordinarily, colour Green means growth and fertility but its biblical meaning is immortality.

 

What were the challenges you faced when you started Imisi?

The first one which every entrepreneur will point out is finance, capital generally. The second is the fear of upholding my passion and having to sponsor it all by myself through God’s grace. Another challenge I faced was family, especially how to get my parents to support my dream but now the story is different.

 

How has the journey been since you started two years ago?

It has been great, interesting and smooth.

 What distinguishes your clothes from the ones sold in the market?

We are more of a modern style and design. We make urban adire wear. We are more civilised and fashionable.  We make adire jeans, sweatshirts, head warmers, skirts, bedspread and pillow case. Basically, we are trying to promote culture in the rural and urban ways. Our designs are quite affordable. Our designs are tailored to meet each customer’s need.

 

Who are your role models in the fashion industry?

I admire “Adire Lounge” and “Melià by Jade”

 

Where do you get inspiration for your designs?

From my surroundings, nature and colours

 

What other things do you do aside your tie and dye business?

I am also a make-up artist, a hair stylist and a singer.

 

Which do you enjoy most, make up, hair styling, singing or adire making and why?

I enjoy adire making more because, it allows me  to express the mind of God as each colour I work with has a biblical meaning. This has helped me to be more creative with my colour combinations before processing the work. For example, since Red signifies “Flesh”, it helps me see deeper into the heart of the designs, so I could make a design that would depict the meaning of the colour. So I spend more time on the making and designing  of my adires more than on my other potentials

 

Where do you see your business in five years time?

In five years time, I see Imisi as a household name both in Nigeria and on the international fashion scene, as well as a source of income for my country.

 

What advice do you have for the youth?

Trust God, work hard, pray hard, invest in people, believe in yourself, and stay away from negative minded people and mediocres. Always add extra to what you know. That’s what makes you extraordinary.

We are promoting culture in rural, urban ways —Seraphina Nwankwo of Imisi Gallery
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Bisi Fayemi, an amazon at 56 https://tribuneonlineng.com/217949/ Wed, 12 Jun 2019 02:52:45 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=217949 Tribune Online
Bisi Fayemi, an amazon at 56

Fayemi

Much has been said, written, read and heard of this multiple award winner, Erelu Bisi Adeleye-Fayemi’s intimidating profile of being born in Liverpool, England on June 11, 1963. That she possessed BA, MA in History from the University of Ife, Nigeria (now Obafemi Awolowo University) and MA in Gender and Society (1992) from Middlesex University, […]

Bisi Fayemi, an amazon at 56
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Bisi Fayemi, an amazon at 56

Fayemi

Much has been said, written, read and heard of this multiple award winner, Erelu Bisi Adeleye-Fayemi’s intimidating profile of being born in Liverpool, England on June 11, 1963. That she possessed BA, MA in History from the University of Ife, Nigeria (now Obafemi Awolowo University) and MA in Gender and Society (1992) from Middlesex University, UK is no longer news. Today, I will be looking at Erelu who doubles as Iyalode as a writer, feminist, politician and a mother.

When you want to talk about Erelu as an author, then you want to talk of a prolific and renowned author who, within a space of five years, turned out three voluminous books apart from other contributions to national and international journals.  You will also agree with me that to be a prolific writer, you must be an avid reader and that is who Erelu Bisi Fayemi is. No wonder in 2013 alone, Erelu chunked out two voluminous books, namely; “SPEAKING FOR MYSELF” with 490 pages and “SPEAKING ABOVE A WHISPER” which has 280 pages.  These two books were reproduced in 2014 despite her very tight schedule as the workaholic wife of the governor in an election year for that matter.

If anyone wants to say that; “Yes, she could write books while in government because she had a lot of facilities to do so, what of another giant stride with the LOUD WHISPERS published in 2017?  This 412-page book, you will agree with me, is a masterpiece! Just as she is using her pen to agitate for feminism, she is also raising her voice to advocate the cause of the oppressed and fight against child abuse.  No wonder, she was recently bestowed a great honour of Zik Award 2018 for her leadership trait over the years.

Delving into where she actually cut her teeth for activism, I will tell you that Erelu did not suddenly wake to become an activist like many hungry activists today who created the proliferation of several non-governmental organisations in Nigeria. Erelu has experience as a feminist thinker and writer, social entrepreneur, policy advocate, trainer, social change philanthropy practitioner, communications specialist and social sector expert.

There is no way one can divorce Erelu’s writings from her feminist activism as noted in a review done on her book by the former Head of Department of English and Literary Studies, Ekiti State University, Dr Lara Owoeye.  In her review of the LOUD WHISPERS, Owoeye wrote inter alia: “in the opening pages and first part, the author’s stance on issues of feminist import takes centre stage as she bears her mind on a range of perspectives on the theoretical and practical aspects of popular feminist postulations…”

As a thoroughbred woman activist, Erelu served as a Principal Partner, Amandla Consulting which specialises in leadership development for women and she ran an online community called Abovewhispers.com, where she wrote an immensely popular weekly column called Loud Whispers which she has now turned into a book. She was a UN Women Nigeria Senior Advisor, and was recently appointed as a Visiting Senior Research Fellow at King’s College, University of London before returning to support her husband who was re-elected as the governor of Ekiti  State in 2018.

“Bisi Adeleye-Fayemi is an avowed feminist ideologue who does not shy away from the feminist movement but states without prevarication that “I am a feminist, no ‘Ifs’ no ‘Buts”. In LOUD WHISPERS, she makes use of stories and essays to bring to the fore a number of issues plaguing the womenfolk, Nigeria as a nation and Africa in general. LOUD WHISPERS is, indubitably, a statement of her stance on the perception and treatment of women by a society that takes little cognizance of their existence. It will instantly clear the mist from the eyes of any doubting Thomas on the aspirations and expectations of the advocates of the feminine movement.” Lara Owoeye wrote.

Her contributions to motherhood won’t be complete if I fail to mention that she served as the Director of Akina Mama wa Afrika (AMwA), an international development organisation for African women based in London, UK, from 1991-2001 as well as Executive Director of the African Women’s Development Fund, (AWDF) – the first Africa-wide grant-making fund, which supports the work of organizations promoting women’s rights in Africa, from 2001-2010.  Interestingly, during the first tenure of her husband as a governor in Ekiti State, Erelu replicates AWDF by creating Ekiti Women Development Fund (EWDF) where the interests of Ekiti women were being protected.

It is on record that Bisi Fayemi sponsored a bill to the State House of Assembly to fight against gender inequality and child abuse in Ekiti State.  With this, those engaging in child trafficking and women abuse had to sit tight during the first tenure of her husband.  Though this law was not properly utilised during the regime of the immediate past administration in Ekiti State, on the return of Governor Kayode Fayemi, Erelu had read a riot act to women abusers at a special reading of her book, LOUD WHISPERS recently by the Ekiti State chapter of the Association of Nigerian Authors by asking them to “Park well.”

Erelu as a politician. She is one woman who had swum in many troubled waters at the risk of blackmail and orchestrated propaganda, yet she successfully handled all situations to bring calmness which many a man will find difficult to achieve during the last electioneering.  To draw home this point, I will like to briefly narrate my personal experience with her, this time, not as a journalist but as a politician.

Considering the too many knotty problems Erelu solved during the build-up to the  governorship primary election of APC in Ekiti State which I cannot start to mention here, I will rather describe her as a stabilizer in Ekiti politics. Erelu on her own calmed down a lot of frayed nerves to rally support for her husband.  I can’t forget an occasion at the party secretariat before the rally when she went to meet some disgruntled stakeholder women who were so belligerent but Erelu did not give a damn. She met them and was able to break their ranks to get a sizeable number of them on the side of her husband.  An interesting aspect of this woman of virtue as a politician is that she does not see politics as a do or die affair.  Even after the election when her husband had been sworn in, she told her followers times without number that “please, I don’t want to hear ‘some people are for JKF some people are for that’.  We are now in government and everyone is for JKF”. This is the spirit!  No wonder it is said that; behind every successful man, there is a woman.

Above all, looking at Erelu is a mother of repute giving her own son and other people’s children new lease of life and the best education a parent can think of.  In terms of being submissive, Erelu has always been supportive to us all especially during social engagements and in our respective domestic affairs.

On this note, I present to you a quintessential woman of virtue, an author, politician, activist and a mother, Erelu Olabisi Adeleye-Fayemi, our Mother General in Ekiti!

Tai Oguntayo is the Senior Special Assistant, Media to Governor Kayode Fayemi

Bisi Fayemi, an amazon at 56
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Wow in black and white https://tribuneonlineng.com/216570/ Wed, 05 Jun 2019 04:43:24 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=216570 Tribune Online
Wow in black and white

Tosin Imosemi, a graduate of Accountancy from BOWEN University, Iwo, Osun State, is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Tosanne Vogue International, Ibadan, Oyo State. In this piece, she writes about the significance of black and white colours in fashion.   Technically, black isn’t a colour, neither is white. This means any colour you pair […]

Wow in black and white
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Wow in black and white

Tosin Imosemi, a graduate of Accountancy from BOWEN University, Iwo, Osun State, is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Tosanne Vogue International, Ibadan, Oyo State. In this piece, she writes about the significance of black and white colours in fashion.

 

Technically, black isn’t a colour, neither is white. This means any colour you pair with them are okay since they are not going to clash.

What is even more amazing is that black and white together come in beautiful and bold patterns such as stripes (bold and slim), hounds tooth, plaid, gingham, and of course polka dots. The creative possibilities of black and white combinations are endless and these make them designers delight.

BREAKING: Nigeria’s Prof Mohammed-Bande elected President UN General Assembly

Also called monochrome, they are staples in any woman’s wardrobe whether they are trendy or not. For the trendy ladies and gents, they can be worn in various classy and statement designs. They are seasonless, timeless and undated as they are always in vogue. While the fashion circle comes around every 10 years, the black and white colours remain ever relevant, no matter the time or location; they are ever available to help you stand out!

As an African designer, black and white Ankara and lace fabrics are a dream to work with, they birth inspiration and fashion possibilities that are limitless. A  designer’s creative juices   flow  when there’s an array of patterns and variants of textures of fabric available.

The next time you go fabric or dress shopping and you’re looking for something that will go with everything and will remain trendy forever, think black and white! It’s totally worth it!

Wow in black and white
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I quit my job to pursue passion for environment, concern for changing climate —Fadeyi https://tribuneonlineng.com/216573/ Wed, 05 Jun 2019 04:42:08 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=216573 Tribune Online
I quit my job to pursue passion for environment, concern for changing climate —Fadeyi

Yetunde Fadeyi, founder of Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability Initiative for Africa (REES Africa), a youth-led non-profit initiative, advocates environmental sustainability across all target audience and provides renewable energy access for rural and marginalised communities. In this interview with Yejide Gbenga-Ogundare, she talks about her passion for sustainable solutions to the issues of energy, poverty […]

I quit my job to pursue passion for environment, concern for changing climate —Fadeyi
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I quit my job to pursue passion for environment, concern for changing climate —Fadeyi

Yetunde Fadeyi, founder of Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability Initiative for Africa (REES Africa), a youth-led non-profit initiative, advocates environmental sustainability across all target audience and provides renewable energy access for rural and marginalised communities. In this interview with Yejide Gbenga-Ogundare, she talks about her passion for sustainable solutions to the issues of energy, poverty and environmental deficits in five major states in Nigeria, touching lives century-old rural communities with no prior access to electricity in Lagos and Oyo states, among other issues.

 

How would you describe Yetunde Fadeyi?

Yetunde Fadeyi is an embodiment of the new Africa; working tirelessly to effect change in Africa by redefining the African lifestyle through sustainability. She is a social impact advocate with focus around clean energy, equality and the environment. I am the founder of Renewable Energy and Environmental Sustainability Initiative for Africa (REES Africa), a youth led, non-profit initiative which advocates for environmental sustainability across all target audience and provides renewable energy, access for rural and marginalised communities. I spent the last 24 months providing sustainable solutions to the issues of energy poverty and environmental deficits in five major states in Nigeria, my sincere passion has birthed over 24 impactful projects in Nigeria and powered eight century-old rural communities with no prior access to electricity in Lagos and Oyo states.

JUST IN: Israel’s First Lady Nechama Rivlin dies at 73, PM Benjamin Netanyahu mourns

In a bid to pursue passion for the environment and concern for our changing climate, I quit my job in February 2018 and through this work, I now organise over 200 volunteers in REES Africa across five states in Nigeria and in Ghana and over 20, 000 direct beneficiaries of our energy and environmental sustainability programmes and intervention organised in the last 24 months. I also mentored youths into providing for profit entrepreneurial solutions to environmental challenges. I will say I am a prodigious vibrant young woman who positions herself to make a huge contribution to a better earth, a better Africa for us and future generations. I have over six years’ progressive experience in project management, business development, sales & marketing, campaign specialist, social media strategy, renewable energy, environmental sustainability, climate change, digital marketing & facilitation and entrepreneurship. I am also a certified expert on inclusive service delivery and the SDGs from The Hague Academy in The Netherlands.

 

How would you describe what you do?

My concern from the environment stems from a perspective of urgency. What I engage in is highly needed in our clime if we are to survive the impending doom. We have begun to experience the effects of climate change as it is too late to stop this catastrophic change. Species are going extinct at an alarming rate including giraffes; humans will soon be on that list. Our energy demands keeps skyrocketing with increasing population in Africa which even jeopardizes our habitat as energy is the major contributor to climate change, economic growth and lifestyle. What I do is so urgent that it determines if our children will die of old age or climate catastrophe. –

 

Aside this, what else do you do?

Asides advocating for the environment and implementing sustainable community development projects, I am also passionate about small businesses. Hence, my interest in digital marketing to help businesses drive sales and publicity on a budget. My interest in small businesses also sprouted the desire to help business owners create sustainable businesses. I render free corporate/ business sustainability training to organisations such as SoFresh to enable sustainability in their processes, not as an afterthought. I also have a few other businesses I run in order to make ends meet.

 

Why are you so in love with nature and the environment?

My love for nature stems from the realisation of how big God is and as for the environment, I would not say it is necessarily love – I think it is more than that. It is about survival, our environment is our habitat. No species can exist without one and as it stands, we are at the brink of losing our habitable planet. I have experienced the effects of what energy poverty and environmental issues can cause. I was a victim of flooding throughout my teenage years which could have been avoided if people disposed their waste appropriately. My father kept spending ridiculous funds renovating the fences and building trenches but when the floods came, they made a way. Only if he knew that the lifestyle of the community was his problem. We lost a whole lot. Also, I was a direct victim of energy poverty as my childhood friend and family died of carbon monoxide poisoning from a generating set. I have also witnessed the pains and struggles of a Niger Delta community where their livelihood, lifestyle and the environment has been destroyed immensely by fossil fuel.

 

How did you get into it?

As regards my academic background, I studied Chemistry from the University of Ibadan but I have since diversified into pursuing my passion for solving environmental challenges, borne from my experiences. I needed to change the narrative so I enrolled for a Masters programme in Energy and Environment in 2017 to acquire in-depth knowledge about this field and international exposure, but funding was a huge barrier. Today, under my leadership, with no masters and very limited international exposure, I have successfully done things differently from what is obtainable in the books. I have mentored youths, illuminated communities, provided solutions and trained a team of hundreds who provide out-of-the-box entrepreneurial solutions to environmental and energy challenges in communities across Nigeria.

 

What is your vision for REES Africa?

I envision a continent fully liberated from energy poverty and fully given to environmental sustainability practices.

 

Which aspect of your activities do you enjoy most?

It is truly difficult to choose but essentially, the execution phase of the projects is what I enjoy the most. It is fulfilling to see indigents and the pro poor experience a change that they have anticipated for so long (for free). The joy that comes with lightning up communities and seeing people actually do better for their environment is what I enjoy the most.

 

How do you balance being an advocate for green environment with other things you do?

It is basically just planning and prioritisation. There are days that I get so overwhelmed but I survive and get back in shape.

 

As a young woman, how do you get people to take you seriously?

In taking me serious, I have been tagged as being too intense and related to Margaret Thatcher and Angela Merkel, character wise. In getting people to take me serious as a young woman, I speak my truth always and  I am always confident in my abilities. It can be difficult being a young woman, more so being a young woman in an uncharted and “abstract” territory but work has to be done.

 

How relevant is your business to the average women?

It is said that the effect of our environmental issues will hit developing countries the more and hit women harder. Addressing some of the environmental issues around us is plastic pollution- it is known that the effects of plastic pollution on women are bound to increase infertility and cancer. The adverse effects of air pollution resulting into dementia are stronger in women who have the APOE4 gene, a genetic variation that increases the risk for Alzheimer’s. In rural and marginalised areas where energy poverty is prevalent, women are responsible for ensuring the availability of firewood and lighting from archaic sources jeopardizing her health. In addressing these issues, this organisation is relevant as providing mitigation or adaptive solutions can help liberate the average woman.

What are the challenges you face?

Essentially, organisations like ours face a great challenge of funding. Apart from this, religion is another challenge. How do you explain to a religious person the effects of climate change and the fact that climate catastrophe is near without hearing comments like the world is about to end. Taking a cue from the bible, God gave us dominion and an instruction to protect the earth. Dominion is not destruction which we have successfully achieved with our selfish actions and desires. A major challenge is the government as well- how does the government sign the Paris agreement, attend all COP sessions and still make plans to solve our electricity issues with coal? How does the government include in its Economic growth and recovery plan more refineries? How does the government see the use of electric cars as a threat to economic development?

 

Where do you see REES Africa in five years time?

In the next five years, REES Africa as a community of millennial passionate about the environment will record more youths operating for profit enterprise solutions for the environment and being the torch in different intrapreneurship engagements. As an NGO, we would have reached out to at least 3 million people across three sub Saharan counties in Africa as regarding energy access and environmental sustainability.

 

What in your background prepared you for this?

I think it was my experience as a victim that prepared me because I have always wondered how I could stop complaining and make some changes.

 

How long have you been into this?

Two years now.

 

What advice do you have for other young women with similar vision?

Life is not a competition, it is a journey. In this journey, do what makes you happy, put your skin to the work and never settle for less.

 

If you are not doing this, what would you be doing?

Married perhaps and working with one of the biggest audit firms in Nigeria.

I quit my job to pursue passion for environment, concern for changing climate —Fadeyi
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Developing mental health through secure attachment https://tribuneonlineng.com/216566/ Wed, 05 Jun 2019 04:31:12 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=216566 Tribune Online
Developing mental health through secure attachment

Since 1949, Mental Health America has led the observance of May as Mental Health Month. But what does the term “mental health” really mean? When you boil it down, mental health is the ability to adequately adapt to the demands of life as we travel in and out of the various roles we play every […]

Developing mental health through secure attachment
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Developing mental health through secure attachment

Since 1949, Mental Health America has led the observance of May as Mental Health Month. But what does the term “mental health” really mean? When you boil it down, mental health is the ability to adequately adapt to the demands of life as we travel in and out of the various roles we play every day. This means feeling comfortable with oneself and in positive connection with others, having the flexibility to think outside the box, being patient, feeling emotions, and repairing and moving beyond conflict. In many ways, mental health is about resilience.

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So how do we encourage psychological resilience? Attachment theory, coined by psychologist John Bowlby, asserts that the ability for an individual to form an emotional and physical “attachment” to another person gives a sense of stability and security necessary to take risks, branch out, and grow and develop a personality.

Building on this work, Daniel Siegel, clinical professor of psychiatry at UCLA’s School of Medicine, identified five key processes that parents can practice to help children develop psychological resilience and positive emotional well-being, leading to psychological and emotional health in adulthood:

  1. Contingent collaborative communication is when a parent responds to an infant’s verbal and non-verbal cues in a timely and effective manner, allowing the infant to develop a sense that the world is a safe place and her/his needs will be met. According to Siegel, “when there is contingent collaborative communication, the brain functions optimally both within itself and within present and future relationships.”
  2. Reflective dialogue is the practice of a parent talking to a child about thoughts, feelings, perceptions, memories, sensations, attitudes, beliefs, and intentions. Siegel asserts that these eight elements help kids develop compassion and “mindsight” — a term coined by Siegel to describe the human capacity to perceive the mind of the self and others: “[Mindsight] is a powerful lens through which we can understand our inner lives with more clarity, integrate the brain, and enhance our relationships with others. Mindsight is a kind of focused attention that allows us to see the internal workings of our own minds. It helps us get ourselves off of the autopilot of ingrained behaviors and habitual responses. It lets us ‘name and tame’ the emotions we are experiencing, rather than being overwhelmed by them.”

Siegel suggests putting the above-mentioned eight elements on a list to remember to intentionally discuss each of them with your child.

  1. Conflict repair and reconnection is the means to resolve conflicts that are based upon missed connections. Conflict is a natural and important part of being in relationship with others and is inherently neither good nor bad. What makes conflict healthy or unhealthy is whether genuine, caring efforts to repair the conflict are exhibited.

When parents model appropriate conflict repair and reconnection, kids learn how to regulate their nervous systems when conflict arises. Take this instance:

A child is playing and exclaims, “Mommy, I am so excited about my new toy!” Mommy, who is engrossed in a new book, says “that’s great” without looking up, making eye contact, or seeming to care at all about the child’s excitement. The child walks away with her head down, feeling bad and shameful that she was not paid attention to. Suddenly, mom realizes that this was a missed connection. She jumps up, goes to her child, makes eye contact, and says, “I am really sorry I did not pay attention to you. I am available now.” This is a solid demonstration of conflict repair and reconnection that the child will remember and assimilate into her own future actions.

  1. Coherent narrative refers to how clearly, logically, and with what appropriate emotional distance a parent tells the story of their life to their child. Attachment research has determined that the most powerful predictor of a child’s attachment to a parent is the coherence of that parent’s autobiographical story – the more coherent the narrative, the more chance of secure attachment.
  2. Emotional communication is the sharing and amplifying of positive emotional states in a child (i.e., joy, excitement) and the sharing and soothing of negative emotional states (i.e., fear, anxiety). A parent’s ability to tolerate and even embrace these emotions, then help their child regulate her/his emotional state, is critical to secure attachment and mental health. According to Siegel: “It’s important that parents really take joy in their children and to have a lot of fun with them; to really just be amazed at the miracle of life and the fact that we’re alive and can connect with each other. It’s an incredible opportunity for joining and that joy that can come from that kind of connection is something parents should share with their children. It is important that parents not just solve problems when it comes to a child’s negative emotions, but that they share the negative emotional state with the child. The parent needs to learn to tolerate the child’s negative emotional state, not just sweep it under the rug. By tolerating these negative emotions the parent teaches the child that negative emotions can help us learn about ourselves. Ultimately, we can learn to soothe ourselves not by running away from those states, but actually by going toward them and then helping ourselves feel calmed and soothed.”

If you are a parent or parent-to-be, it is critical to pay attention to how you do or will demonstrate secure attachment and resilience with your children through role modeling and interaction.

It’s never too late to improve your mental health.

Courtesy: psychologytoday

Developing mental health through secure attachment
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How I developed interest in Aso-Oke — Mayowa Alajo https://tribuneonlineng.com/213483/ Wed, 22 May 2019 06:34:42 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=213483 Tribune Online
How I developed interest in Aso-Oke — Mayowa Alajo

Aso-Oke

Mayowa Alajo is the brains behind the bespoke fashion jewelling outfit, Mastic Beads. In this interview with Rotimi Ige, she speaks about her sojourn in the fashion industry, among other issues.   Tell us a bit about yourself and early memories of family life:  I was born into the family of Pastor and Pastor Mrs […]

How I developed interest in Aso-Oke — Mayowa Alajo
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
How I developed interest in Aso-Oke — Mayowa Alajo

Aso-Oke

Mayowa Alajo is the brains behind the bespoke fashion jewelling outfit, Mastic Beads. In this interview with Rotimi Ige, she speaks about her sojourn in the fashion industry, among other issues.

 

Tell us a bit about yourself and early memories of family life: 

I was born into the family of Pastor and Pastor Mrs Amure of Redeemed Christian Church of God (RCCG),  from Osun State, a few decades ago. I graduated with a  B.Agric from Olabisi Onabanjo University( OOU)  in 2005 and I am married with beautiful children.

 

When did you take an interest in fashion?

I developed interest in fashion right from my university days. I started with bead making and was also selling ready-made clothings/accessories.

 

When did you decide to take it up as a business?

In 2012, but fully in 2015.

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What challenges did you face?

The number one challenge I faced was getting sincere weavers and access to information. Considering the fact that I did not have the background of Aso oke, but the flair for the business stemmed from my younger sister’s wedding thus I had to learn on the job.

 

You are one of the most popular Aso- oke customers in the South West. Why Aso Oke?

I realised that it will afford me the opportunity to showcase and embellish the already rich Yoruba heritage/dress- culture especially as it is now becoming acceptable even beyond Yoruba society. Also, it gives me the opportunity to be creative without having to be conscious of western acceptance.

 

What peculiar designs do you do?

My designs are based on inspiration as well as  my client’s desires. We work at continuously standing out and exuding creativity.

 

You also ‘bling’ different fabrics and do some by hand. What is the difference between those done by hand and those done with machine?

The hand remains the tool in both cases as even the machine is operated by hand. (laughs). The difference however lies in the cost, pattern and delivery time.

 

Are your customised aso-oke expensive?

Price/cost is always suggestive but everyone can have one based on his/her budget.

 

What would you say is Mastic’s unique selling point in the fashion industry?

Credibility- being true to what we promise as well as ensuring customer satisfaction all the way. Also, we believe in giving back to the community, hence  we give different promotional packages at different times to ensure happy customers all the time. Another one is coming soon and it will be advertised.

 

What is the difference between fashion and style?

Fashion is a trend, an outward virtue involving the totality of creativity while style is about an individual and related to fitness/suitness.

 

You are also a musician. What inspires you to sing?

The word musician sounds too much of a qualification for me. Maybe a lover of music and a singer would be more appropriate for me. However, my motivation for singing comes whenever I see the wonders of God, when I reflect on who He is and my mood.

 

Any plans for music as a profession or is it only a past time?

Definitely yes. It is part  time, at least for now.  No-one knows tomorrow, as they say.

 

How I developed interest in Aso-Oke — Mayowa Alajo
Tribune Online

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‘I have no regret dumping Applied Mathematics for catering’ https://tribuneonlineng.com/213481/ Wed, 22 May 2019 06:31:32 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=213481 Tribune Online
‘I have no regret dumping Applied Mathematics for catering’

catering

Adedolapo Akintomide is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Dollypee Diva Bellz Creations. The graduate of Pure and Applied Mathematics from Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH), Ogbomoso, Oyo State, speaks with OYEYEMI OKUNLADE on how she ventured into catering and her principles as an entrepreneur.   You studied Pure and Applied Mathematics, why the  […]

‘I have no regret dumping Applied Mathematics for catering’
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
‘I have no regret dumping Applied Mathematics for catering’

catering

Adedolapo Akintomide is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Dollypee Diva Bellz Creations. The graduate of Pure and Applied Mathematics from Ladoke Akintola University of Technology (LAUTECH), Ogbomoso, Oyo State, speaks with OYEYEMI OKUNLADE on how she ventured into catering and her principles as an entrepreneur.

 

You studied Pure and Applied Mathematics, why the  change to catering?

I started right from tertiary institution. Cooking has always been my passion so I usually cook for people. I remember the very first cake I baked about 13 years ago without anyone’s help. Though I didn’t get the accurate measurement, the cake came out real good. So I decided to go for some training in 2009 and I started the business formally in 2011.

 

Aside from passion, what motivates you?

I get motivated when impacting lives of everyone that comes to acquire business knowledge from me. In addition to this, I derive my business power from knowing that I am helping people.

 

What aspect of your business do you derive pleasure  from the most?

I derive pleasure from creating new ideas or improving old ones as well as in mentoring and coaching others. I also enjoy finding a way to solve a problem or to help people  overcome their challenges.

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Many people are engaged in this business, what stands you out?

What actually makes my cake business unique is my level of creativity. How I mix my flavours and the fluffiness of it has actually earned me a lot of referral from my customers.

 

Who are your customers?

I have numerous customers, ranging from commissioners, permanent secretaries to directors of companies, bank managers. These are from Oyo, Lagos, Ekiti and many other states.

Any regret for not practising your profession?

Honestly, I have no regrets because the business pays me well. It enables me to have time for myself.

What are the challenges you face in the business?

The major challenge I face is the high price of ingredients in the market which reflects on the prices of the cakes. This makes our customers to complain while some have had to cancel their orders. However, we usually talk them out of it by assuring them of getting nothing but the best.

 

Where do you see your business in five years time?

I see my businesses doing well and my brand name all over the world as they have really given me a lot of prestige and fame, especially my cakes.

 

You combine other demanding and time-consuming businesses with catering, how have you been coping?

Yes, I am also into events management and planning, makeup, etc in addition to my catering services. Though they are all time- consuming and demanding but with the help of God through my assistants and apprentices, everything seems easy.

 

So far, how many people have you trained and what are their categories?

By God’s grace, I have trained over 40 people and they are doing well in their choice business. Some are now professional cake decorators, bakers, professional make-up artists and the likes. The 40 people include: young and old, married and singles, graduates and undergraduates and secondary school students.

 

Your happiest moment so far?

My happiest moment so far waswhen my business began to blossom and made impact in people’s lives.

 

Principles that have helped you as an entrepreneur…

Being a successful entrepreneur, in my opinion, is a function of how you deal with setbacks, defining your personal goals and purpose early and focusing on your strength rather than fixing weaknesses. Don’t stop believing, learning and growing as an entrepreneur.

‘I have no regret dumping Applied Mathematics for catering’
Tribune Online

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Former head of state, five govs honour Saratu Aliyu https://tribuneonlineng.com/213478/ Wed, 22 May 2019 06:26:41 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=213478 Tribune Online
Former head of state, five govs honour Saratu Aliyu

Hajia Saratu Iya Aliyu was on Thursday, May 16, sworn in as the national president of the Nigerian Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mines and Agriculture ((NACCIMA) at the national convention of the association which was held in Kaduna. The newly installed president took over from Iyalode Alaba Lawson who was the first  female and 19th […]

Former head of state, five govs honour Saratu Aliyu
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Former head of state, five govs honour Saratu Aliyu

Hajia Saratu Iya Aliyu was on Thursday, May 16, sworn in as the national president of the Nigerian Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mines and Agriculture ((NACCIMA) at the national convention of the association which was held in Kaduna.

The newly installed president took over from Iyalode Alaba Lawson who was the first  female and 19th president of the association.

Hajiya Saratu Iya Aliyu,  first female Northerner and 20th National President of Nigerian Chambers of Commerce, Industry, Mines and Agriculture (NACCIMA), was honoured by  former head of state, General Abdussalam A. Abubakar (GCFR) who was the  chairman of her investiture ceremony.

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The event was attended by people from all walks of life, including five governors.

Governors who attended the inauguration were: Governor of  Jigawa State, Alhaji Badaru Abubakar, Governor  of Niger State Alhaji Abubakar Sani Bello; Governor  of Kogi State, Alhaji Yahaya Bello;  Governor  of Plateau State, Dr. Lalung,Governor of  Kaduna State, represented by Prof. Kabiru Matu.

Iyalode Alaba Lawson, the immediate past president  of the association became the life Vice President.

Hajiya Saratu Aliyu will pilot the affairs of NACCIMA for the next two years when she will hand over the baton of the association to her 1st Vice President.

Former head of state, five govs honour Saratu Aliyu
Tribune Online

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