Natural Health – Tribune Online https://tribuneonlineng.com Breaking News in Nigeria Today Thu, 16 Jan 2020 01:50:02 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 https://tribuneonlineng.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/logo.jpg Natural Health – Tribune Online https://tribuneonlineng.com 32 32 118125416 Honey, aloe vera hasten healing after tooth extraction https://tribuneonlineng.com/honey-aloe-vera-hasten-healing-after-tooth-extraction/ Thu, 16 Jan 2020 01:46:05 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=284557 Tribune Online
Honey, aloe vera hasten healing after tooth extraction

By Sade Oguntola   Honey has traditionally been used for the treatment of ulcers and wounds and has also been used in modern medicine. The US food and Drug Administration recently approved Manuka honey for the treatment of burns and ulcers. Researchers have evaluated the effect of honey on different wounds such as burn wounds, […]

Honey, aloe vera hasten healing after tooth extraction
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Honey, aloe vera hasten healing after tooth extraction

By Sade Oguntola

 

Honey has traditionally been used for the treatment of ulcers and wounds and has also been used in modern medicine. The US food and Drug Administration recently approved Manuka honey for the treatment of burns and ulcers.

Researchers have evaluated the effect of honey on different wounds such as burn wounds, diabetic wounds, compression wounds, and contaminated surgical wounds. Honey, compared with some other conventional local medicaments, improves the healing process in mild-to-moderate surface burn wounds.

Now, in a new study, researchers also recommended the use of honey to decrease wound sizes and ensure faster healing after extraction of teeth in children.

They found that honey decreased wound size and accelerated wound healing after extraction of teeth in children.

The Iranian researchers had evaluated the effect of honey on the healing of tooth extraction wounds in 51 patients, four to nine years of age. All required extraction of one deciduous molar tooth. They were randomly assigned to two groups.

The children had no history of systemic conditions, use of medications and allergy to honey, and had not repeatedly used honey during the previous six-month period.

They also excluded children that suffered a widespread injury during the tooth extraction, or subjects who used mouthwashes or any specific medication from the day of tooth extraction until the seventh day.

In group 1, after extraction of the tooth, the dentist used a cotton swab applicator to place a layer of honey on a piece of gauze moistened with normal saline solution (NSS) and placed it on the socket. In group 2, honey was not used; rather, NSS was applied. On days three and seven after tooth extraction, the wound sizes were measured.

Comparison of the two groups at different time intervals showed that wound size on third and seventh day after tooth extraction was significantly lower in the honey group compared with the NSS group.

In both honey and NSS groups, the wound sizes on day three were significantly smaller than those at the day of tooth extraction. In addition, on day seven, they were significantly smaller compared with day three.

In addition, the severity of pain and swelling, too, decreased significantly on days two, three, and five compared with day one.

The researchers said in the 2019 edition of the Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice that in patients in which a large number of teeth are extracted under general anaesthesia, honey can play an important role in decreasing pain and other postoperative morbidity, complications, and in accelerating wound healing.

They suggested that the ability of honey to heal wounds from tooth extraction might be attributed to its effect on prevention of the proliferation of common disease-causing organisms in the mouth, resulting in shortening of the healing period.

They declared, “Honey resulted in a decrease in wound sizes and faster healing after extraction of teeth in children. Therefore, the use of honey can be recommended after minor surgeries in the mouth.

“Use of this natural substance is a simple and cost-effective technique. In addition, honey is a natural product without any side effects and is easily tolerated by the child due to its pleasant taste and aroma. Therefore, its use is recommended after minor and even major surgeries in the oral cavity.

The researchers, however, said that since the positive effect of the honey can be due to the additive effect of honey and normal saline, to specify the pure effect of honey, more studies is required.

Previously, a cross-sectional randomized interventionist study said aloe vera is economical and effective in ensuring faster healing in the tooth extraction site.

The researchers in the 2017 edition of the Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research had studied the effectiveness of Aloe Vera on the healing of the wound after extraction of teeth in 40 patients.

In addition to healing the common complaint associated with extraction wound without any side effect, the aloe vera group had less pain after two hours of its application.

In the study, the aloe vera group showed 70 per cent healing on the third day and 90 per cent healing on the seventh day and the patients who were under analgesics showed 60 per cent healing on the third day 76 per cent healing on the seventh day.

Aloe vera has antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. It also helps increase collagen formation and blood supply, which can promote wound healing. People can apply aloe vera gel to a ball of gauze and place it over the dry socket.

Honey, aloe vera hasten healing after tooth extraction
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Regular consumption of chilis improves overall health —Study https://tribuneonlineng.com/regular-consumption-of-chilis-improves-overall-health-study/ Thu, 16 Jan 2020 01:30:29 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=284562 Tribune Online
Regular consumption of chilis improves overall health —Study

According to a recent study, people who regularly consume chilli peppers have a reduced mortality risk compared with those who never eat chilis. A new study concludes that chilis might reduce mortality risk. Chili peppers are now a global phenomenon. From Cambodia to California, and from Birmingham, Alabama to Birmingham, United Kingdom, spicy food is […]

Regular consumption of chilis improves overall health —Study
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Regular consumption of chilis improves overall health —Study

According to a recent study, people who regularly consume chilli peppers have a reduced mortality risk compared with those who never eat chilis.

A new study concludes that chilis might reduce mortality risk.

Chili peppers are now a global phenomenon. From Cambodia to California, and from Birmingham, Alabama to Birmingham, United Kingdom, spicy food is ubiquitous.

Throughout history, cultures have associated various health benefits with eating chili peppers. However, as one of the authors of the recent study, Professor Licia Lacoviello, explains, many of these beneficial properties have been ascribed “mostly on the basis of anecdotes or traditions, if not magic.”

In more recent times, scientists have focused on capsaicin, the compound that gives chili their unmistakable punch. According to the authors of the latest study, capsaicin “has been observed to favorably improve cardiovascular function and metabolic regulation in experimental and population studies.”

Other researchers have concluded that capsaicin might be useful in the fight against neuropathic pain, arthritis, gastrointestinal disorders, and even cancer.

Although interest is mounting, only a few studies have investigated the impact of regularly eating chilis on overall health and mortality.

The authors, from the Mediterranean Neurological Institute in Italy, mention two population studies designed to answer this question. One took place in China, and the other in the United States. Both reported lower mortality risk in the individuals who consumed the most chili peppers.

In this recent study, the authors set out to confirm or deny these earlier findings in a European population. Also, by analysing cardiovascular disease biomarkers, such as lipid levels in the blood, they hoped to identify how chili peppers might reduce mortality risk.

To investigate, they took data from the Molisani study; this data set includes 24,325 men and women living in Molise, Italy. After excluding individuals with missing data, 22,811 people took part.

They published their findings in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

All participants were over 35 years of age, and researchers followed them for an average of 8.2 years. During this time, the researchers captured information about the 1,236 participants who died during the study.

The scientists also had access to information about other factors that can influence health outcomes, including medical history, leisure-time physical activity, smoking status, alcohol intake, and socioeconomic data.

Each participant completed a questionnaire about their dietary habits during the year before enrollment in the study, including questions about chili peppers.

In total, 24.3 per cent of the participants consumed chili peppers four or more times each week, and 33.7 per cent consumed chili peppers either rarely or never. The authors summarize their findings:

“In a model adjusted only for age, sex, and energy intake, regular consumption [ four or more times each week] of chili pepper was associated with 23 per cent lower risk of all-cause mortality, as opposed to none/rare intake, and results remained substantially unchanged in the fully adjusted model.”

When considering heart disease, the authors found that regular consumers of chili peppers had a 34 per cent lower risk of cardiovascular mortality than those who rarely consumed chili peppers.

The beneficial effect was most pronounced in cerebrovascular-related deaths and ischemic heart disease.

When they investigated cancer mortality, they found that although chili peppers were associated with a drop in risk, it did not reach statistical significance.

The authors analysed deaths caused by anything other than cancer and cardiovascular disease. Here, too, chili peppers seemed to provide a benefit. The authors write that “regular intakes were associated with [a] lower risk of other causes of mortality.”

Interestingly, when the scientists controlled for diet quality, it did not influence the findings.

“[P]rotection from mortality risk was independent of the type of diet people followed. In other words, someone can follow the healthy Mediterranean diet; someone else can eat less healthily, but, for all of them, chili pepper has a protective effect.”

Compared with those who ate the least chilis, those who ate the most were more likely to be male, more highly educated, and older.

Surprisingly, given the conclusions of the study, those who ate the most chilis were also more likely to have diabetes and hypertension, higher levels of blood lipids, and a higher BMI, compared with those who rarely ate chilis.

Because these are risk factors for cardiovascular disease, the authors believe that this suggests the mechanism by which chilis reduce mortality risk is independent of classic cardiovascular risk factors.

How chili peppers might benefit health is still up for debate, though. Some scientists have theorized that, because capsaicin might aid weight loss, this could explain the benefits. However, in this study population, the group that consumed the most chilis had a higher average body mass index (BMI).

Although the study echoes the findings of two extensive studies carried out in the U.S. and China and involved a large pool of participants, the authors do recognize some limitations. First and foremost, this was an observational study, meaning that it is difficult to tease apart cause and effect. In these studies, it is always possible that other factors that researchers did not measure influenced the results.

They also note that although the overall number of participants was high, the number of deaths in each category was relatively low. As an example, there were only 173 cancer-related deaths in the group that rarely ate chilis.

Also, dietary information was only collected once at the beginning of the trial. People’s diets change over time; this is an issue that plagues research into health and nutrition.

In this study, the top category of chili consumption included those who ate hot chilis four or more times each week. In follow up work, it would be interesting to see if the effect differed in individuals who ate chilis once or twice each day.

Overall, the authors conclude that “[r]egular consumption of chili peppers is associated with [a] lower risk of total and [cardiovascular disease] mortality.” The evidence that chilis might benefit health is mounting; the next step will be to understand how.

—Medscape

Regular consumption of chilis improves overall health —Study
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Zobo boosts effectiveness of blood pressure medication —Experts https://tribuneonlineng.com/zobo-boosts-effectiveness-of-blood-pressure-medication-experts/ Thu, 09 Jan 2020 04:54:42 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=282054 Tribune Online
Zobo boosts effectiveness of blood pressure medication —Experts

Zobo

Scientific evidence suggests that the daily consumption of hibiscus tea, which is commonly known as zobo, in an amount readily incorporated into the diet, can help to lower blood pressure in mild to moderate hypertensive adults. Now, in a study, experts say taking zobo along with the prescription drug lisinopril, a blood pressure medication, ensures […]

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Zobo boosts effectiveness of blood pressure medication —Experts

Zobo

Scientific evidence suggests that the daily consumption of hibiscus tea, which is commonly known as zobo, in an amount readily incorporated into the diet, can help to lower blood pressure in mild to moderate hypertensive adults.

Now, in a study, experts say taking zobo along with the prescription drug lisinopril, a blood pressure medication, ensures its better effectiveness in blood pressure control.

Experts at the Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, and Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, had studied the effect of zobo, the Hibiscus Sabdariffa (Calyxes) water extract, on the availability of Lisinopril in animals.

The availability of lisinopril alone and in presence of Hibiscus tea was determined at the stomach, intestine and blood pH.

Zobo is commonly taken as a food drink alongside lisinopril, especially in people with hypertension, probably due to its reported antihypertensive effect.

Its tea and the drink has been shown to work as a natural diuretic, pulling salt out of the body which is a mechanism by which blood pressure is reduced.

50% of public primary schools in Nigeria have no toilets —UBEC

Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as lisinopril dilate the blood vessels to lower hypertension or treat heart failure.

The 2019 study, which involved I. Nasir, M. Aminu, A.M. Ismail, A Salisu and G Magaji, was published in the Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research.

The researchers found that taking lisinopril with zobo drink or hibiscus tea could enhance its availability consequent to the increased dissolution of lisinopril in simulated gastric, intestinal and blood pH.

The significant increase in the availability of lisinopril when it interacted with Hibiscus sabdariffa, the study said, could enhance the dissolution of lisinopril when interacted or administered with zobo drink or hibiscus tea, especially in the stomach and in the blood.

Dr I. Nasir declared: “It is a common practice to see individuals taking a prescription drug for antihypertensive medications outside the hospital also taking zobo drink and moringa. They believe that when they take it together, they get better. And when you check their blood pressure, it would have dropped miraculously.”

He declared, “the result of the study has proven that zobo drink helps in checking their high blood pressure.”

According to him, “its pharmacological effect will definitely be seen. In fact, there is a banker; all that she takes in the morning for her hypertension is the sour zobo drink which contains no additive like sugar.

“Many studies have shown that zobo drink has some antihypertensive effect. In fact, some prescribers recommend that instead of using water to swallow the drug, they could use a zobo drink. But they advise not to take zobo drink that contains sugar.”

The researchers, however, said further studies on the effect of varying concentrations of zobo on the bioavailability of lisinopril would still need to be evaluated.

The antihypertensive efficacy of Hibiscus sabdariffa extract has been documented in both preclinical studies and randomized control trials.  A multicentric pilot clinical study in Jordan reported in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine that zobo is generally well-tolerated and seems to be helpful in treating uncontrolled hypertension, with or without medication.

This 2019 study had assessed the use of Hibiscus sabdariffa in cases of uncontrolled hypertension, either with or without medication, as validated by several clinical trials.

This trial involve 38 participants with blood pressure above 140/90           mmHg consumed H. sabdariffa tea. The blood pressure and other parameters such as satisfaction, possible side effects, and interactions with other medications, were considered.

Of the 38 participants, 29 finished the programme, 72 per cent of whom were taking antihypertensive medication due to uncontrolled hypertension and 28 per cent of whom were not, zobo was generally well tolerated.

In addition, 38 per cent of participants reached the target blood pressure at the end of the study and 65 per cent saw their systolic blood pressure decrease by at least 10mmHg.

What is more, a  double-blind randomised controlled trial that compared the antihypertensive effectiveness of hibiscus tea with black tea infusion in diabetic patients showed consuming hibiscus tea had positive effects on blood pressure in type 2 diabetes patients with mild hypertension.

Results in the Journal of Human Hypertension (2008) showed a statistically significant systolic blood pressure decrease in the sour tea group (134.4 to 112.7 mm Hg). In the black tea group, blood pressure increased from 118.6 to 127.6 mm Hg.

However, people taking blood pressure medications like the Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as lisinopril should avoid eating large amounts of zobo as well as foods high in potassium including avocados, oranges and orange juice, potatoes, spinach, tomatoes and tomato sauce.

 

Nigerian Tribune

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Experts name best chewing stick for healthy teeth https://tribuneonlineng.com/experts-name-best-chewing-stick-for-healthy-teeth/ Tue, 31 Dec 2019 17:08:51 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=277189 Tribune Online
Experts name best chewing stick for healthy teeth

sticks

THE use of chewing sticks can be a cost-effective and efficient means of preventing tooth decay. Now, in a new study, experts say that Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides may be the best option because of its high salivary fluoride retention. In a new study, researchers said the high fluoride retention in the saliva makes Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides a […]

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Experts name best chewing stick for healthy teeth

sticks

THE use of chewing sticks can be a cost-effective and efficient means of preventing tooth decay. Now, in a new study, experts say that Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides may be the best option because of its high salivary fluoride retention.

In a new study, researchers said the high fluoride retention in the saliva makes Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides a cost-effective and efficient means of preventing tooth decay if used properly at regular interval.

Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides is a local chewing stick known in Yoruba as Orin Ata.

For the study, the researchers determined and compared the salivary fluoride retention after the use of different fluoride-containing chewing sticks and a non-herbal fluoridated toothpaste.

Fluoride in toothpaste has contributed immensely to the prevention of tooth decay worldwide.

This double-blind cross-over experimental study was undertaken among 20 randomly selected senior secondary students in Ibadan, Nigeria.

The 2019 study in the Journal of Contemporary Dental Practice involved Emeke U, Obontu T.J, Olushola I, and Akinyele A at the Faculty of Dentistry, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan.

Saliva samples were collected to establish baseline fluoride concentration before the use of chewing sticks and non-herbal fluoridated toothpaste. These were Alchornea laxiflora(pepe), Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides (Orin ata), Anogeissus leocarpus (Ayin) and Masularia acuminate(Pako Ijebu/atu uhie in Igbo).

Four commonly used chewing sticks and one non-herbal fluoridated toothpaste were each used at two days interval, and saliva samples were collected at 0, 10, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after each use.

These samples were stored and transported in special coolers to the laboratory, where they were analyzed for fluoride concentration using a spectrophotometer at the wavelength of 620 nm.

At 60 minutes, Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides had the highest average fluoride concentration of 44.75 ppm. The differences in average salivary fluoride concentrations amongst these tooth cleaning aids at 60 minutes were statistically significant.

Previously, Professor Juliana Taiwo, at the 2016/2017 inaugural lecture of the University of Ibadan, entitled “Nature, Disease and Oral Health: The Conspiracy Triad of the Ageing Dentition”, said Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides contains enough fluoride and within a safe limit to prevent tooth decay.

According to her, a study that investigated the fluoride content of 10 commonly used chewing sticks in Nigeria found that Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides contained the highest amount of fluoride, a little more than even the affordable fluoride toothpaste.

The chewing sticks tested included Musularia acuminate (pako ijebu in Yoruba/atu uhie in Igbo), Terminalia glycosides (irin idi), Alchorea laxiflora (pepe), Anogeissus leocarparpus (Ayin) and Azadirachta indica (dongoyaro or neem).

The others are Jatropha mutifida (ogege), guava twig, bitter leaf twig and mango twig.

Professor Taiwo said the natural fluoride in Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides was retained in the saliva longer than that in non-herbal fluoride toothpaste.

She, nevertheless, said since the chewing stick is being used to clean the teeth, its tuft must be ensured to clean all surfaces of the teeth and the tongue.

“At the community, we found about 70 per cent of those elderly using chewing stick were actually just chewing it and not using its tuft to brush their teeth and tongue. So, they end up having a lot of plaque and calculus.”

Moreover, a previous study had demonstrated that three local chewing sticks performed better than fluoride-based and conventional kinds of toothpaste in preventing tooth decay. The local chewing sticks are Fagara zanthoxyloides, Vernonia amygdalina and Massularia accuminata.

The 2016 study titled “A Study of the Anticaries Activity of Three Common Chewing Sticks and Two Brands of Toothpaste in South West Nigeria” was published in British Journal of Pharmaceutical Research.

The results showed that the ethanol extracts of Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloides showed the highest tooth decay preventive effect followed by Vernonia amygdalina and then Massularia acuminata.

Also, both brands of toothpaste were inferior to the ethanol extracts of all the chewing sticks in the anti-caries activity. This is not unexpected since chemical kinds of toothpaste owe their antimicrobial property to the presence of fluorides as part of their ingredients.

Until now, some of these chewing sticks have been shown to possess varying degrees of antimicrobial activity against oral microbial flora which indicates, therefore, that the chewing sticks, in addition to providing mechanical stimulation of the gums, also destroy microbes.

This is a feature which is absent in the common toothpaste and brush method. This advantage of the chewing sticks over the conventional toothpaste and brush could explain why many Africans have strong teeth.

Some African chewing sticks have also been reported to contain fluoride ions, silicon, tannic acid, sodium bicarbonate and other natural plaque inhibiting substances that can reduce bacterial colonization and plaque formation.

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Common vegetable effectively tackles obesity —Expert https://tribuneonlineng.com/common-vegetable-effectively-tackles-obesity-expert/ Thu, 12 Dec 2019 02:34:21 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=274826 Tribune Online
Common vegetable effectively tackles obesity —Expert

obesity

Until recent times, being obese was considered to be evidence of wealth in the South-Western part of Nigeria. As a result of a combination of wrong attitudes, ignorance and carefree lifestyle, a sizeable percentage of the population has become predisposed to obesity an emerging global problem. Effective weight loss strategies call for eating less food, […]

Common vegetable effectively tackles obesity —Expert
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Common vegetable effectively tackles obesity —Expert

obesity

Until recent times, being obese was considered to be evidence of wealth in the South-Western part of Nigeria. As a result of a combination of wrong attitudes, ignorance and carefree lifestyle, a sizeable percentage of the population has become predisposed to obesity an emerging global problem.

Effective weight loss strategies call for eating less food, burning more calories — or ideally, both. But for the many that suffer from obesity, a disease that contributes to conditions ranging from heart disease to cancer, behavioural change is hard to accomplish or not effective enough.

That is why scientists have long sought drugs that would help people shed pounds. Yet effective, long-lasting treatments have thus far eluded them.

Herbal medicine has been used for the treatment of disease for more than 2000 years, and it has proven efficacy. Many studies have confirmed that herbal medicine is effective in the treatment of obesity, but the mechanisms are not clear.

Now, in a new study, researchers said that Solanecio biafrae (Èfó Wòròwó) can help to reduce weight and fats in pre-obesity, making it effective in the treatment of obesity.

For the study, 31 pre-obese individuals who were not on any fat or weight reduction medication and 45 age-matched non-obese volunteers were investigated as control test and control subjects respectively.

The 2018 study in the Journal of Herbal Drugs involved Mathew Olaniyan at the Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Edo University, Iyamho, Edo State.

There was a significantly lower weight, total cholesterol and fat in pre-obese subjects after treatment than before treatment, confirming the traditional health benefit claim of Èfó Wòròwó at reducing total cholesterol, weight and body fat in pre-obese subjects.

Èfó Wòròwó (Solanecio biafrae) is an important vegetable in Nigeria that is cooked and used as spinach. Among the Yoruba-speaking people of south-western Nigeria, a leaf extract of Senecio biafrae is used to stop bleeding from cuts or injury and in Sierra Leone and Cameroon a leaf extract is used to treat sore eyes.

In Côte d’Ivoire, its pulped leaves are applied to the breasts as a galactagogue.  In Congo, it is used to treat cough and heart troubles, as a tonic and to relieve rheumatic pain, prurient allergies and localized oedemas.  In Yoruba culture, it is associated with rituals to ward off smallpox.

The leaf, or a leaf extract is used as a wound dressing and to stop bleeding; a leaf extract is used to treat sore eyes. The sap is taken by draught for treating coughs in children.

The high edible mucilaginous fibre, leaves and stem are used to treat indigestion or as a laxative and as purgative. Its leaves are a good source of protein and fibre.

Crude fibre plays an important role in preventing colon cancer and constipation. Furthermore, dietary fibre decreases the absorption of cholesterol from the gut in addition to delaying the digestion and conversion of starch to simple sugars, which is an important factor in the management of diabetes.

Its mineral content includes sodium, iron, potassium, aluminum, calcium, zinc, selenium, magnesium and cobalt as well as vitamins such as vitamins E, C, K, A and vitamin B complex.

Previously, researchers had looked for scientific evidence to support named herbal medicine for the treatment of obesity from 2007 to 2017. Medicinal plants mentioned include Nigella sativa( black cumin), Citrus aurantium(bitter orange), lemon, Irvingia gabonensis (African mango, bush mango, dika or ogbono), Crocus sativus, red ginseng and green tea.

In the 2017 edition of Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, they said that Nigella sativa, Camellia synensis, green tea, and black Chinese tea seem to have satisfactory anti-obesity effects.

What’s more, Cyperus rotundus and lemon are best in decreasing fat absorption as well as its deposits in a study published in the 2018 International Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research that compared the anti-obesity efficacy of seven plants.

In addition, researchers in a study published in Appetite, have found that capsaicin can increase satiety and fullness when added to the diet, and may thus prevent overeating.

Capsaicin is an active compound found in chilli peppers that have demonstrated anti-cancer and antioxidant properties, protection against some neurodegenerative disease and anti-obesity effects.

Also, regular consumption or including castor oil in the regular diet prevents fat absorption and initiates better metabolism, which is, of course, necessary during weight loss.

Common vegetable effectively tackles obesity —Expert
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Fluted pumpkin seeds candidate for male contraceptives —Scientists https://tribuneonlineng.com/fluted-pumpkin-seeds-candidate-for-male-contraceptives-scientists/ Thu, 05 Dec 2019 02:39:39 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=272551 Tribune Online
Fluted pumpkin seeds candidate for male contraceptives —Scientists

pumpkin

Some components of the human diets are believed to be promising male contraceptive agents. Now, fluted pumpkin seeds may be the next candidate for male contraceptives. In a new study, scientists evaluated the anti-fertility activity of fluted pumpkin seeds and found that it may selectively act on the sperm-producing cells, leading to low sperm count, […]

Fluted pumpkin seeds candidate for male contraceptives —Scientists
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Fluted pumpkin seeds candidate for male contraceptives —Scientists

pumpkin

Some components of the human diets are believed to be promising male contraceptive agents. Now, fluted pumpkin seeds may be the next candidate for male contraceptives.

In a new study, scientists evaluated the anti-fertility activity of fluted pumpkin seeds and found that it may selectively act on the sperm-producing cells, leading to low sperm count, oxidative damage and androgen insufficiency.

They said the reversibility of these effects to near-normal levels after the withdrawal of treatment justifies further consideration of fluted pumpkin seed-supplemented diet as an effective and readily reversible agent that meets the required criteria of a male contraceptive agent.

Potent and safe forms of contraception suitable for different couples and diverse cultures are crucial for family planning. Obviously, numerous fertility control efforts are aimed at women, and men have been asked to share in this responsibility.

The call for men to be equal partners with women in fertility regulation has been slow due to limited acceptable contraceptive options. Although efforts to develop effective plant-derived male contraceptive agents have been undertaken, the progress on it has been minimal.

For instance, daily use ofTripterygium wilfordii extract elicited antifertility properties in animals and men by distorting sperm development and lowering sperm count but its use was associated with adverse side effects.

Furthermore, gossypol obtained from cotton seed oil provoked antifertility effects in human and animal models through a reduction in sperm quality and an increase in sperm mortality, degeneration of the testis and disruption of sperm and male hormone production.

The irreversibility of low sperm count, slow contraceptive effectiveness, and other undesired side effects associated with some plant-derived contraceptive agents have heightened the focus of most laboratories on the search for potential plant-based male contraceptives that satisfy the criteria  of  an  effective  male-contraceptive agent.

Telfairia occidentalis, commonly called fluted pumpkin, is an important dietary item and deep-rooted part of herbal medicine, especially in the eastern part of Nigeria.

As a food, the fleshy kernel obtained from deshelled and boiled seeds of fluted pumpkin is consumed as snacks while its fermented form is used as a seasoning to flavour soup.

Its leaves have been reported to promote blood formation in the body, protect the liver, and for its therapeutic efficacy on induced benign prostatic enlargement.

For the study, healthy male Wistar rats of average body weight 135 g rats were given fluted pumpkin seed-supplemented diet at 2.5, 5 and 10 per cent for 60 days.

This 2019 study in the journal, Systems Biology in Reproductive Medicine, involved Rex-Clovis C. Njoku, Sunny O. Abarikwu, Augustine A. Uwakwe, Chidimma J. Mgbudom-Okah and Chioma Yvonne Ezirim at the University of Port Harcourt.

They were placed on observation for another 60 days after the withdrawal of treatment. The control animals received normal standard rat diet not supplemented with fluted pumpkin seeds.

The sperm quality variables, testosterone and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), oxidative status of the testis and other fertility parameters were determined to evaluate the anti-fertility activity of fluted pumpkin seeds.

Treatment of animals with fluted pumpkin seed-supplemented diet at five per cent and 10 per cent resulted in decreased serum and intra-testicular testosterone and FSH concentrations.

Furthermore, poor sperm motility, count, morphology and viability as well as a severe reduction in sperm production observed especially in the 10 per cent dietary fluted pumpkin seeds-treated animals reverted to nearly control values 60 days after withdrawal of treatment.

The researchers suggested that the observed low sperm count  could be due to selective action of fluted pumpkin seeds on developing germ cells.

They declared that the available evidence shows that fluted pumpkin seeds-supplemented diet promotes the arrest of sperm production in adult rat’s testes through multiple mechanisms including the direct killing of Sertoli cells.

According to them, “The reversal of the antifertility effects of fluted pumpkin seeds on testicular functions makes it a potential male contraceptive candidate. However, further studies to confirm this view are therefore warranted.”

Previously, researchers in the 2018 Toxicology Reports warned that Telfairia occidentalis (Ugu) aqueous leaves extract in high doses over a period of time is toxic to sperm production. They said a moderate use and consumption of the extract should only be encouraged.

Fluted pumpkin leaves caused a dose-dependent significant decrease in testosterone levels. At high doses, it distorted seminiferous tubules cytoarchitecture when compared to the control group. Thus, bringing to the fore that the production of quality sperms is highly dependent on the integrity of the testis.

Fluted pumpkin seeds candidate for male contraceptives —Scientists
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Swedish bitters reduce antibiotic effectiveness —Experts https://tribuneonlineng.com/swedish-bitters-reduce-antibiotic-effectiveness-experts/ Thu, 28 Nov 2019 02:16:19 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=269878 Tribune Online
Swedish bitters reduce antibiotic effectiveness —Experts

antibiotic

Herbal medicines have emerged as a common choice therapy for self-care among individuals and are now taking a more active role in users’ healthcare. In addition, irrational claims or advertisements by manufacturers through different mass media have enhanced the wide spread use of herbal medicines among the general population in developing countries. Most of the […]

Swedish bitters reduce antibiotic effectiveness —Experts
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Swedish bitters reduce antibiotic effectiveness —Experts

antibiotic

Herbal medicines have emerged as a common choice therapy for self-care among individuals and are now taking a more active role in users’ healthcare.

In addition, irrational claims or advertisements by manufacturers through different mass media have enhanced the wide spread use of herbal medicines among the general population in developing countries.

Most of the time, the herbal medicines are sold as non-prescription medicine and the patients use it along with the prescribed conventional medicine at their own risks.

Herb-drug interaction is an important factor to be investigated because there is always a chance to get undesirable therapeutic effect of the prescribed allopathic medicine.

Ciprofloxacin is a widely used antibiotic of the class, fluoroquinolones that is active against numerous germs that cause a variety of illnesses such as respiratory and urinary tract infections.

It is rapidly and well absorbed from the walls of the intestine, widely distributed in the body with good tissue penetration. However; its absorption can be affected negatively, if taken alongside other things that contain metal ions or calcium-fortified orange juice.

This includes metal ions such as aluminum, calcium, copper, iron, magnesium, manganese and zinc found in dairy products (milk, cheese and yogurt), antacids and mineral supplement.

Now, Swedish bitters elixir, as the name indicates, is very bitter. The preparation made from a blend of various parts and fruits of plants such as Aloe Vera, Cinamum aromaticum, Citrus aurantifolia, Acinos arvensis and Chenopodium murale.

The Swedish bitters name, at first seems likely that the ingredients come from the country of Sweden (Swedish), but this is not the case. The name derives from the Swedish physicians Dr. Claus (Klaus) Samst. The elixir is said to be the creation of Swiss physician, Dr. Phillipus Paracelsus, who practised in the 1500s.

Different brands of Swedish bitters in Nigeria is indicated for the treatment of kidney and bladder infections, normalise intestinal movement, help regulate blood pressure, facilitate digestion and to control body weight.

Now, experts who investigate the possible drug-herb interaction of Yoyo bitters cautioned on ingesting different Swedish bitters elixir with Ciprofloxacin, a group of antibiotic to treat respiratory and urinary tract infections.

The researchers showed that co-administration of this brand of Swedish bitters alter the effectiveness of antibiotics like Ciprofloxacin and suggested staggering its time of administration as a better option.

The 2018 study in the Tropical Journal of Natural Product Research involved Olubukola C. Martins at the Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Lagos, in collaboration with Moshood O. Akinleye, Grace E. Ukpo, Aderonke A. Adepoju-Bello, Bukola B. Odediran, Esther O. Onun and Paul A. Makinde.

The researchers had studied the possible drug-herb interaction between Ciprofloxacin tablet and Yoyo bitters when co-administered in 30 healthy volunteers that were divided into two treatment groups.

All participants were non-smokers and not on any medications. They also abstained from coffee, grape fruits, antacids, multivitamins cimetidine, green tea, food supplements, beverages or drug that can affect ciprofloxacin four weeks before investigation.

In addition, they were in good health as indicated that medical history and routine physical examinations. The volunteers were regularly monitored during the experimental period for the development of any possible adverse effect.

Each group either took ciprofloxacin (500 mg) tablet with 200 mL of water or ciprofloxacin with 30 mL of yoyo bitters. A wash out period of two weeks was observed, and the treatment groups were interchanged. Blood samples were thereafter collected and analysed for the antibiotic.

The tested bitters contained a large amount of calcium, magnesium, lron, zinc, manganese and copper that are sufficient to lower Ciprofloxacin absorption

That means the bioavailability of ciprofloxacin will be reduced in the presence of yoyo bitters and consequently resulted in a reduction in therapeutic efficacy of ciprofloxacin, though the result is not significant.

According to them, “For the desired therapeutic effect of ciprofloxacin to be optimally achieved, concomitant administration with Yoyo bitters or any herbal preparation should be staggered.”

In 2008, experts in the Journal of Applied Research had cautioned that orange juice should also be ingested at least two hours before or after ciprofloxacin administration. Available ofloxacin decreased significantly in the volunteers who had taken the drug with orange juice than those who had taken the drug with water.

The study was conducted with Bangladeshi people said ofloxacin should not be taken with orange juice under any circumstances as the potential suboptimal drug exposure will the patient at more risk of treatment.

Also, there is the chance of the infecting germ become resistant to the drug, thereby restricting treatment options for the patient in the future.

Meanwhile, the extent of a juice-drug interaction may be associated with factors such as volume of drinking juice, fruit varieties, type of fruit and time between juice drinking and drug intake.

Swedish bitters reduce antibiotic effectiveness —Experts
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African garden egg perfect food option for diabetes https://tribuneonlineng.com/african-garden-egg-perfect-food-option-for-diabetes/ Thu, 21 Nov 2019 00:31:21 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=267462 Tribune Online
African garden egg perfect food option for diabetes

Garden egg

NUTRITIONISTS recommend African garden egg as a perfect food option for those interested in losing weight because of its high fibre content. It fills up the tummy quickly, and this subsequently reduces consumption of other high calories options. What is more, African garden egg is also a perfect snack for those with diabetes or those […]

African garden egg perfect food option for diabetes
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African garden egg perfect food option for diabetes

Garden egg

NUTRITIONISTS recommend African garden egg as a perfect food option for those interested in losing weight because of its high fibre content. It fills up the tummy quickly, and this subsequently reduces consumption of other high calories options.

What is more, African garden egg is also a perfect snack for those with diabetes or those concerned about preventing complications of diabetes on their liver.

Wonder, why this is so? Well, researchers  in a study said garden eggs curb elevated blood sugar by inhibiting key enzymes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is a common condition that affects a person’s blood sugar (glucose) control, and left untreated, serious health complications can occur, including kidney failure, nerve damage, heart disease and stroke.

Symptoms of diabetes often occur slowly and can include fatigue, increased thirst, frequent urination, unexplained weight loss and blurred vision.

People with, or at risk for, diabetes, should follow a balanced diet that emphasises fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats and healthy fats in appropriate serving sizes.

Also, different varieties of garden eggs found in Africa has a low glycemic index as well as a blood cholesterol-lowering and antioxidant effects.

Researchers in this study said that Solanum kumba was the best option in terms of its nutritional properties. Also, garden egg was able to manage the effect of the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced kidney toxicity in male Wistar rats than the metformin-treated group.

This 2018 study published in the journal, Food Science and Nutrition involved Esther Emem Nwanna at the Federal University of Technology, Akure in collaboration with Emmanuel O. Ibukun and Ganiyu oboh.

For the study, the researchers determined the effect of eggplant diet supplementation on kidneys of Wistar rats that had diabetes and then assessed their blood sugar lowering effect over a 14-day period.

They also determined the antioxidant properties as well as the nutritional and glycemic index of these commonly found eggplants (Solanum kumba, Solanum aethiopicum, and Solanum gilo) indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa.

The glycemic index (GI) measures the effects that certain foods have on blood sugar levels. Foods can have a low, medium, or high GI value depending on various factors, including food particle size, processing techniques and cooking methods.

Analysis of these African eggplants showed that they had moderate content of carbohydrate, high fibre as well as low fat, protein and low ash contents. All the eggplant had a low glycemic index below 50 per cent. It ranges between 30.16 per cent and 38.65 per cent.

The diabetes-induced animals that were treated with metformin and eggplant diet had a lower level of triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoproteins while there were increased high-density lipoproteins.

This study to further explore the function of these indigenous species of eggplant observed that 40 per cent Solanum kumba eggplant diet was more effective than the 20 per cent.

There are many varieties of the African eggplant, with a range of shapes, sizes and colours, the eggplant most commonly found across Africa is ‘Solanum aethiopicum’. This variety has a brilliant red exterior and is about the size and shape of an egg, giving it the name, garden egg.

Eggplant such as Solanum kumba, Solanum aethiopicum, and Solanum gilo are commonly found in all season in Nigeria. Commonly called garden egg or scarlet eggplants, they are consumed daily in different forms such as in soup and stew, eaten raw either used as fruits or vegetables.

Eggplants are part of folklore remedy, which is used to curb elevated blood sugar and increased weight gain in Nigeria.

Different reports have emphasised natural products such as medicinal plants or plant fruits and vegetables such as avocado, based on folklore as medicine to treat or manage diabetes.

Research shows that replacing a low-fat, complex-carbohydrate rich diet with an avocado-rich diet can significantly improve blood glucose levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

The research from the University of Guelph suggests avocado may even protect against type 2 diabetes because it contains a compound, known as avocatin B, found only in avocados inhibit processes in the pancreas that normally lead to diabetes.

The main sugar found in avocado is a unique form known as D-mannopheptulose which does not act as conventional sugar. It helps to satisfy the sensations of hunger and supports improved blood glucose control and weight management.

Together with their protein content, avocados are particularly filling and boost the tendency to eat less overall.

African garden egg perfect food option for diabetes
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Turmeric may help with asthma control in children https://tribuneonlineng.com/turmeric-may-help-with-asthma-control-in-children/ Thu, 14 Nov 2019 01:59:02 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=264859 Tribune Online
Turmeric may help with asthma control in children

Turmeric, asthma, asthma control

In recent years, turmeric, a spice used in Asian countries, has attracted the attention of researchers due to its reported effectiveness in inflammatory and other disorders. Now, Brazilian researchers say turmeric may help with asthma control in children. Scientists from the University of Sao Paulo and the University of Ribeirao Preto report a randomised, double-blind, […]

Turmeric may help with asthma control in children
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Turmeric may help with asthma control in children

Turmeric, asthma, asthma control

In recent years, turmeric, a spice used in Asian countries, has attracted the attention of researchers due to its reported effectiveness in inflammatory and other disorders. Now, Brazilian researchers say turmeric may help with asthma control in children.

Scientists from the University of Sao Paulo and the University of Ribeirao Preto report a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II clinical trial which indicated that powdered turmeric may help with asthma control in children.

Turmeric is commonly used in Ayurvedic therapies, primarily to treat the skin, heart, liver, and lungs. It’s thought to fight allergies and boost immunity.

Bronchial asthma affects 100 to 150 million people worldwide and approximately 180,000 deaths annually are attributed to asthma.

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterised by such symptoms as coughing, chest tightness, wheezing and shortness of breath.

They said in addition to standard treatment, powdered turmeric consumption led to less waking up at night, less frequent use of medication, and “better disease control” compared to placebo.

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The new study published in the 2019 Journal of Ethnopharmacology had used turmeric that was simply powdered and encapsulated. Each capsule contained 250/ mg of powdered turmeric, providing 11/ mg of curcumin and 2/ mg of demethoxycurcumin.

It recruited 55 children and adolescents with persistent asthma and randomly assigned them to receive a maltodextrin placebo or the turmeric capsules (30/ mg/kg/day) for six months, in addition to standard treatment.

Both groups experienced improvements in symptom frequency, and the impact of asthma on their daily lives decreased, but only participants in the turmeric group experience less waking up at night, less frequent use of medication (short-acting beta-adrenergic agonists), and “better disease control” at both three and six months.

Given that the study used a relatively low dose of turmeric, and they declared “one can speculate that, should a larger dose be used, differences in other aspects could be observed”.

Furthermore, they caution against generalising their results to “all asthmatic patients in other settings since our population consisted mostly of patients with moderate and severe asthma”.

Previously, a study that followed 77 participants with mild to moderate asthma who took curcumin capsules for 30 days indicated tumeric as add-on therapy in patients of bronchial asthma. It was in the 2014 Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research.

Researchers found that it was a safe supplement to help reduce airway obstruction and could be a helpful complementary treatment for asthma.

However, they said that further clinical evaluation is needed with more number of subjects, a higher tolerated dose and for a longer duration.

Still more research, ginger, well known as a therapy for an upset stomach, is demonstrated in several recent studies, in animals and in human cells tested in a laboratory to open constricted airways.

The study published in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology found ginger works by simultaneously inhibiting an enzyme that helps cause airway muscles to constrict and activating another enzyme that tends to relax the airways.

The study, which tested the effects of ginger components on isolated human airway cells, found ginger worked particularly well in combination with a medication currently used in bronchodilators that asthmatics carry in case they have trouble breathing.

Several studies in rodents found injections of ginger extracts helped ease simulated asthma conditions.

A French study, published in 2008 in the journal International Immunopharmacology, found a ginger extract softened an inflammatory reaction in mouse lungs after the mice were exposed to allergens that irritated their lungs.

Moreover, honey is also good for asthma. It has anti-inflammatory properties, and it is a common ingredient in cold and flu remedies. Honey increases saliva production, which may reduce coughing and throat irritation.

The health department of the University of California, Los Angeles recommends that adults take two teaspoons of honey at bedtime to reduce coughing.

Evidence has not supported other theories about honey as a treatment for asthma. Most relevant research has tested the effectiveness of honey as a cough suppressant.

A study from 2012 included 300 children aged between one and five years with upper respiratory infections. Researchers gave some children citrus honey, eucalyptus honey, or Labiatae honey.

Others received a placebo. Children who took honey had relief from nighttime coughing, which resulted in improved sleep.

While taking one or two teaspoons of honey are usually safe for most people, there are a few exceptions. According to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), infants under the age of one should not be given honey, due to the risk of botulism.

Botulism is a rare type of poisoning caused by the bacteria Clostridium botulinum. Botulism may cause vomiting, trouble breathing, and paralysis, and it can be life-threatening. It is primarily transmitted through contaminated soil and food.

 

Nigerian Tribune

Turmeric may help with asthma control in children
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Jute leaf inspired treatment for miscarriage, preterm labour —Study https://tribuneonlineng.com/jute-leaf-inspired-treatment-for-miscarriage-preterm-labour-study/ Thu, 07 Nov 2019 01:53:37 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=262253 Tribune Online
Jute leaf inspired treatment for miscarriage, preterm labour —Study

jute leaf, ewedu

If you’ve ever tried the delicious slimy soup called ‘ewedu’ in Yoruba or ‘rama’ in Hausa, you know how slimy it is. Now, this slimy soup might inspire future treatment for threatened miscarriage and preterm labour. Scientists in a study of Corchorus olitorius leaf, what is commonly called jute leaf, evaluated its effects on samples […]

Jute leaf inspired treatment for miscarriage, preterm labour —Study
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Jute leaf inspired treatment for miscarriage, preterm labour —Study

jute leaf, ewedu

If you’ve ever tried the delicious slimy soup called ‘ewedu’ in Yoruba or ‘rama’ in Hausa, you know how slimy it is. Now, this slimy soup might inspire future treatment for threatened miscarriage and preterm labour.

Scientists in a study of Corchorus olitorius leaf, what is commonly called jute leaf, evaluated its effects on samples of womb muscles of albino rats and found it significantly decreased the amplitudes of its contractions.

This decrease in the amplitudes of contractions was in a dose-dependent manner such that the highest dose applied (666.67/ ìg/ml) achieved a 100 per cent inhibitory effect.

This study, which also considered the anti-inflammatory effects of jute leaf extract, furthermore said oxytocin-induced contractions were significantly inhibited by both salbutamol and jute leaf extract.

This 2019 online study in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology involved Daniel Orieke, Obioma Christopher Ohaeri, Ifeoma Irene Ijeh, Solomon Nnah Ijioma, all from the Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Abia State.

In that study, neither death nor other acute toxicological symptoms were observed after seven days of administering up to 5000 mg/kg body weight of jute extract to experimental rats.

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According to them, jute leaf extract could be a tocolytic agent. Tocolytic agents are used to maintain pregnancy and may help to prevent preterm labour.

This tocolytic effect of jute leaf extract was attributable to its alkaloids content.  Alkaloids are known to exert reversible smooth muscle relaxant activities.

According to them, “If  the  results  obtained  in  this  study  can be  extrapolated  to  man,  the Corchorus  olitorius  methanol  leaf  extract  may  be  of  value  in  the management on preterm labour and threatened abortion, diarrhoea and inflammations.”

The use of plants to facilitate birth or to protect the young embryo appears to be a common practice among traditional healers. Pregnant women in Nigeria use plant preparations to ease labour and enhance smooth child delivery, particularly among the Yoruba people. The rationale for this is not known and requires pharmacological validation.

In  Ebonyi  State,  the  leaf  extract  is reportedly  used  to manage menstrual disorders associated with excessive womb contractions during menses.

Orba and Nsukka people of Enugu State also use the extract from the plant to arrest threatened miscarriage. It is also used for the purpose of maintaining pregnancy and to prevent preterm labour.

Corchorus olitorius is reportedly used in ethnomedicine to arrest threatened miscarriage and other conditions associated with excessive womb contractions. The plant is also used as a folk remedy for aches and pains, dysentery, enteritis, fever, pectoral pains and tumuors.

The Philippine Department of Health, for instance, had advised an increased intake of jute leaf vegetable, to include banana as well, in order to build resistance against the threat of swine flu.

Jute is rich in minerals, vitamins and antioxidants as well as other nutrients that help the body to fight diseases and maintain good health.

It is a good source of fibre, which makes it helpful in dealing with weight management and may also promote intestinal health by helping with bowel movement.

The green, leafy vegetable is rich in beta-carotene for good eyesight, iron for healthy red blood cells, calcium for strong bones and teeth, and vitamin C for smooth, clear skin, strong immune cells and fast wound-healing.

For the study, pieces of womb and intestine tissues were suspended separately in organ baths containing ideal physiological salt solutions bubbled with air and were tested for responses to standard drugs and jute leaf extract.

Previously, researchers had suggested that individuals that experience acid reflux or heartburn drink ewedu juice to reduce the stomach acid that sometimes finds its way back through the throat.

In a study, researchers tested the antacid properties of jute leaves (ewedu) in male albino rats with a gastric ulcer over a two-week period reduced the stomach acid production in a dose-dependent manner.

The 2015 study was entitled ‘Anti-Ulcerogenic and Gastric Antisecretory Effects of Corchorus olitorius Extract in Male Albino Rats’. It involved Bamidele V. Owoyele; W. Abdulmajeed; B. M. Adisa, O. O. Owolabi and Sabitiu A. Oyeleke, all from the University of Ilorin. It was in the Journal of Herbs, Spices & Medicinal Plants.

Also, in 2016, experts found that the water extracts of jute leaves (ewedu) and root has an antacid activity which supports the ethnomedicinal claims of the use of the plant in the management of acidity as well as an ulcer.

The study, which includes its pharmacological significance as an antacid, found that the extract of jute leaves and its root had 71.33 per cent antacid activity of a drug. It was in the 2016 edition of the International Journal of Pharmacy & Life Sciences.

 

Nigerian Tribune

Jute leaf inspired treatment for miscarriage, preterm labour —Study
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