Editorial – Tribune Online https://tribuneonlineng.com Breaking News in Nigeria Today Tue, 21 Jan 2020 18:57:59 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 https://tribuneonlineng.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/logo.jpg Editorial – Tribune Online https://tribuneonlineng.com 32 32 118125416 Using uniformed men in civilian disputes https://tribuneonlineng.com/using-uniformed-men-in-civilian-disputes/ Tue, 21 Jan 2020 23:39:46 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=286412 Tribune Online
Using uniformed men in civilian disputes

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

INDISCIPLINE and lawlessness have become profoundly entrenched in the country’s socio-political space, manifesting in diverse and concerning forms and shapes and impairing orderliness and the rule of law. Usually, there is cacophony, and rightly so, when evidence of lawlessness in the society points in the official direction. But the truth is that some private individuals […]

Using uniformed men in civilian disputes
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Using uniformed men in civilian disputes

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

INDISCIPLINE and lawlessness have become profoundly entrenched in the country’s socio-political space, manifesting in diverse and concerning forms and shapes and impairing orderliness and the rule of law. Usually, there is cacophony, and rightly so, when evidence of lawlessness in the society points in the official direction. But the truth is that some private individuals too, especially the privileged ones, are no less culpable, judging by their penchant for anarchy and abridgement of the cause of justice using uniformed men. Few days ago, one of two sisters in a household dispute in Lagos invited a soldier to deal with their neighbour but unfortunately, the soldier accidentally shot the elder sister dead. The sketchy narrative of the sordid incident was that the two sisters who had lived at a house located at Seaside Estate, Badore, Ajah, Lagos State, were prevented by a ‘lead tenant’ from relocating to another area until they paid their portion of the outstanding bills. But the younger of the two sisters would have none of that; she allegedly invited her soldier friend to beat up the ‘intruder’ and in the ensuing melee, there was an accidental discharge from the soldier’s gun, killing her elderly sister.

And as is customary for uniformed men who have committed fatal errors while performing unauthorised tasks, the aberrant soldier on illegal duty bolted without waiting to assist in evacuating the victim to the hospital.  Apparently, the sister of the victim who invited the soldier to intervene in a civil and a household matter wanted to get her own version of justice through the back door and in an anarchic fashion, but it boomeranged.  A simple disagreement that could have been reported officially to the police for investigation and settlement one way or the other at the station or in the court of law was allowed to snowball into a disaster that needlessly claimed a life. And this adverse incident happened just because the one party who had access to a uniformed man wanted to be oppressive by causing violence to be unleashed on the other party.

Recently, also, a Divisional Police Officer (DPO) in Warri, Delta State, allegedly stripped two sisters naked and beat up their mother over landlord-tenant issues. This is a grave turn of events because ordinarily, the normal expectation is that in a civil matter, the aggrieved party will make a recourse to the police, as it happened in the instant case, to make an arrest, investigate and settle the matter or charge it to court. But this is not what often happens because in instances like the one described, policemen are not just going to make an arrest; they are recruited by those with personal connections with them to help deal with the person(s) with whom they have a dispute.

Though a majority of such cases usually go unreported, the society is replete with instances where privileged persons and those who have connections with them procure the services of uniformed men to do their ignoble biddings in contravention of the law. This is awful and unacceptable. We deplore the use of uniformed men to settle personal scores as it portrays the society as lawless. Notwithstanding the fact that even the state is sometimes caught in similar reprehensible acts, it is lawless and irresponsible of any citizen to invite uniformed men to intervene in civil disagreements  with a view to carrying  out dastardly actions that impair the rights of other citizens and vitiate the rule of law. By the same token, uniformed men who surrender themselves to be used to unleash anarchy on other citizens for whatever considerations are unruly and are a disgrace to their respective organisations.

Perhaps it has become imperative to have an official system that tracks violators and victims at some critical supervisory levels in the law enforcement agencies so that all cases are captured, investigated and appropriate sanctions meted out to perpetrators. The sanction grid for undisciplined uniformed men who engage in illegal activities could also be reviewed to make it sterner while implementation should be stricter and devoid of espirit de corps that could pervert the course of justice. The objective is to deter would-be perpetrators and erase the impression of impunity that tends to bolster the confidence of wilful uniformed men. While it is patently dangerous and unacceptable for any citizen to resort to self-help over any grievances, it is even more dodgy and objectionable to surreptitiously enlist the services of uniformed men to accomplish such illegality.

We urge the relevant authorities to launch a painstaking inquiry into the Lagos incident while the Commissioner of Police, Delta State, should be dispassionate and show more than a passing interest in the handling of the alleged show of shame in which one of his DPOs in Warri has been implicated.  The culprits, both uniformed men and their civilian accomplices, should be made to face the wrath of the law. It does not bode well for the image of the country, and indeed it is a perilous trend that discipline and decorum are fast becoming rarities among members of regimented services, the same way it is a worrying development amongst the civilian population.

Using uniformed men in civilian disputes
Tribune Online

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Nigeria’s poor showing at 2019 CAF Awards https://tribuneonlineng.com/nigerias-poor-showing-at-2019-caf-awards/ Mon, 20 Jan 2020 23:32:43 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=285949 Tribune Online
Nigeria’s poor showing at 2019 CAF Awards

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

THERE is perhaps no better demonstration of the pitiable state of Nigerian football than the just concluded Confederation of African Football (CAF) Awards, the 28th edition of which was held at the Albatros Citadel Sahl Hasheesh Resort in Hurghada, Egypt. Although Nigeria’s own Asisat Oshoala, who plays as a striker for Spanish side FC Barcelona […]

Nigeria’s poor showing at 2019 CAF Awards
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Nigeria’s poor showing at 2019 CAF Awards

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

THERE is perhaps no better demonstration of the pitiable state of Nigerian football than the just concluded Confederation of African Football (CAF) Awards, the 28th edition of which was held at the Albatros Citadel Sahl Hasheesh Resort in Hurghada, Egypt. Although Nigeria’s own Asisat Oshoala, who plays as a striker for Spanish side FC Barcelona Femeni in the Primeira Division, predictably took home the award for the African Women’s Footballer of the Year (her fourth time, thus equaling the record set by compatriot Perpetua Nkwocha), it was more or less a disastrous outing for Nigeria.

The gong for African Player of the Year deservedly went to Senegalese striker Sadio Mane, who plies his trade with Liverpool FC, the current European and World Club champions. Mane garnered 477 votes, beating his Liverpool mate, Egyptian Mohamed Salah (325 votes) and Manchester City’s Riyad Mahrez (267 votes) to the second and third position respectively. Not only was there no Nigerian player among the top three players on the continent, Nigeria also lost out in the other categories. For instance, despite being nominees for the category of African Youth Player of the Year, both Samuel Chukwueze (Villarreal FC, Spain) and Victor Oshimen (Lille FC, France) eventually lost to Moroccan Achraf Hakimi who plays for German Bundesliga side Borussia Dortmund. Most significantly, no Nigerian was listed in the CAF-Fifpro Best XI, the best African players by position for the year 2019.

It takes no special knowledge to observe that Nigeria’s poor showing at this year’s awards, particularly in the men’s game, continues a downward trend. While Nigeria has failed to produce the winner for the category of African Women’s Footballer of the Year only thrice since 2010, the country has failed to produce a winner in the men’s category since Nwankwo Kanu emerged winner in 1999. In both 2003 and 2004 respectively, Austin Jay-Jay Okocha could only manage a third position. The closest a Nigerian footballer has come was in 2013 when John Obi Mikel was runner up to the Ivorian midfielder, Yaya Toure.

Now, awards are not the be-all and end-all in any area of human endeavour, let alone something as unstable as the fortunes of football players. Yet, especially over time, they can provide a useful vehicle for monitoring the progress of particular individuals, clubs, or countries. Accordingly, it becomes possible to contrast Nigeria’s poor showing over the past decade and more with its relative dominance in the 1990s. For example, between 1992 and 1999, Nigeria produced the winner five times, with Rashidi Yekini blazing the trail in 1993 and Emmanuel Amunike following suit in 1994. Such was the country’s dominance in the 1990s that a Nigerian player was either runner up or third even in the years that a Nigerian was declared winner.

It is an understatement to say that since that glorious era, things have gone south for the country. The explanations for this situation are many, and go beyond the narrow confines of football. Despite repeated promises, the country has failed to modernise its sport. Its stadia are in shambles (the National Stadium, Lagos, and the Obafemi Awolowo Stadium [formerly Liberty Stadium] Ibadan, are good examples), and most of the catch-them-young initiatives which used to provide a platform and training ground for its emerging stars have either completely run aground or are wobbling on their last legs. Today, no Nigerian footballer worth his salt plays in the anaemic Nigerian Professional Football League. What applies to the average footballer applies to every young athlete in any discipline in Nigerian sport.

The solutions to Nigeria’s football (and sporting) problems are too well known to be rehashed here. If the country’s sport administrators don’t sit up and act as a matter of urgency, the country will continue to regress, and its best talents will continue fleeing to other parts of the world where the infrastructure is superior.

 

Nigeria’s poor showing at 2019 CAF Awards
Tribune Online

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The withdrawal of troops from civil duties https://tribuneonlineng.com/the-withdrawal-of-troops-from-civil-duties/ Mon, 20 Jan 2020 02:19:17 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=285598 Tribune Online
The withdrawal of troops from civil duties

Nigerian Army

THE Federal Government has announced a gradual withdrawal of the military operations in volatile spots in the country, beginning from the first quarter of 2020. The Chief of Naval Staff, Vice Admiral Ibok-Ete Ekwe Ibas, who announced the decision after a National Security Council meeting, explained that the withdrawal was to allow the military to […]

The withdrawal of troops from civil duties
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
The withdrawal of troops from civil duties

Nigerian Army

THE Federal Government has announced a gradual withdrawal of the military operations in volatile spots in the country, beginning from the first quarter of 2020. The Chief of Naval Staff, Vice Admiral Ibok-Ete Ekwe Ibas, who announced the decision after a National Security Council meeting, explained that the withdrawal was to allow the military to focus on its primary duty of defending the country against external aggression. He went further to note that the withdrawal of troops would be done after an “assessment” to determine areas where peace had returned, to enable civil authorities to assume full control of security. According to him, the council decided that in place of the military, the Nigeria Police Force, which has the primary responsibility of providing internal security, should assume its duties fully in such areas. In his words, “It is the work of the police to handle internal security since Nigeria is not at war. The Nigeria Security and Civil Defence Corps will support the police to provide internal security.”

The military runs several joint internal operations in various parts of the country with different code names to deal with security threats that have tasked the capacity of the police. This has been the case for over a decade. As far back as 2010, the then Chief of Army Staff, Lt. General O. A. Ihejirika, announced that the Nigerian Army (NA) had deployed 17,000 officers and soldiers for internal security operations. Some of the 17,000 men were deployed to the Southeastern states of Imo and Abia, and the Niger Delta where kidnapping and militancy posed major security challenges. Others were deployed to Plateau, Bauchi and Borno States to checkmate ethno-religious violence.

By 2017, no fewer than 28 of the 36 states were under one form of military ‘occupation’ or another. The massive deployment of the military was informed largely by the escalation in the operations of Boko Haram and the fears  of its possible spread to other parts of northern Nigeria and the country, more broadly. This deployment has increased the number of officers in internal security operations significantly. It has stretched the military to a great extent; the result is that practically every army unit is engaged and there is no redundancy or reserve to cater for the resting and recuperation of troops. The situation has also stretched the limited resources of the armed forces. Thus, such deployments have taken a toll on military readiness for its primary responsibility of defence of the territory and core values of the country against external aggression.

Besides, there have been complaints about the increasing militarisation of democracy in Nigeria arising from the increasing involvement and presence of the military in police duties. Military operations in the Ayakoroma area of the Niger Delta raised a lot of controversies and conflicting reports following alleged massive civilian casualties.  In similar military operations in Odi, Zak Ibiam, and Onitsha, the military was accused of excessive use of force, looting, rape and torture of citizens. These incidents portrayed it in bad light. In addition, there are complaints that the deployments have not been systematically made to address crimes such as banditry and attacks on communities by herdsmen. The military may be legitimately called upon to act in aid of civil authority, but it is not set up essentially for police duties.  Frequent and long-term deployment of the military to police duties is neither in the interest of the military as an institution nor in the interest of democracy and civil culture. It is therefore plausible to withdraw the military from police duties.

Nonetheless, Nigerians are worried about this decision of the government because there is no indication that the security situation has been seriously ameliorated. Several governors and community leaders have called on the government to reconsider the decision. Following this, President Muhammadu Buhari reassured Nigerians that the withdrawal of the military would be from areas where peace had been restored and that it would not be done in a manner that would expose communities to more risks of attacks. The “administration will not abandon citizens in need of protection” and the withdrawal of troops would be done after an “assessment” to determine areas where peace had returned to enable civil authorities to assume full control, he reassured.

We think that this reassurance is not good enough. It will be recalled the president admitted during his new year speech that the fight against insecurity “has not been easy”. He also remarked during the same speech that the government faced the “challenge of winning the peace, the reconstruction of lives, communities and markets”.  We call on the government to provide a comprehensive long-term strategy to deal with the persisting and complex security situation.  This should include a framework for cooperation among all security agencies to ensure synergy among the various agencies in order to avoid situations that blight the image and readiness of the military by overexposure to police duties. Furthermore, the government must ensure that police reform is given priority.  This should include building the capacity of the police by providing them with specialised training, equipment and logistic support.  It should also include the retraining and re-orientation of officers and men of the police with the appropriate skills and values.

Furthermore, the government should look beyond the armed forces in addressing the issue of crime and policing. It is known worldwide that certain socio-economic and governance factors lead to an increase in the rate and gravity of crimes that pervade society.  These factors include unemployment, poverty, inequality, weak law enforcement and injustice. The government must work hard to reduce unemployment among the youths and also reduce poverty in the country.

The withdrawal of troops from civil duties
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Amotekun, FG and Nigeria’s federalism https://tribuneonlineng.com/amotekun-fg-and-nigerias-federalism/ Fri, 17 Jan 2020 02:51:52 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=284913 Tribune Online
Amotekun, FG and Nigeria’s federalism

Amotekun,Nigerian Legion, FG

LAST week, the South-West geopolitical zone’s  response to the persistent orgy of security threats to its peaceful existence in the form of a new security outfit named Western Nigeria Security Network (WNSN), with the code name Operation Amotekun, was launched in Ibadan, the Oyo State capital. The launch in Ibadan was seen to be symbolic […]

Amotekun, FG and Nigeria’s federalism
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Amotekun, FG and Nigeria’s federalism

Amotekun,Nigerian Legion, FG

LAST week, the South-West geopolitical zone’s  response to the persistent orgy of security threats to its peaceful existence in the form of a new security outfit named Western Nigeria Security Network (WNSN), with the code name Operation Amotekun, was launched in Ibadan, the Oyo State capital. The launch in Ibadan was seen to be symbolic because Ibadan was the capital of the old Western Region where the governmental revolution that marked the First Republic was incubated.

In a Nigeria where the people have become justly cynical of government policies, apparently due to decades of parading dross to the people as policies, Operation Amotekun was greeted with celebrations by the people of the six states that make up the South-West, and virtually the entire country.   Clearly, the pains  inflicted by kidnappers across the region in recent times are still being felt. Among the notable casualties, Mrs. Funke Olakunri, daughter of Pa Reuben Fasoranti, the leader of the pan-Yoruba sociocultural group, Afenifere, was killed between Kajola and Ore on the Ondo-Ore road in Ondo State sometime in July 2019.

Kidnapping and other crimes soared to unimaginable proportions during the marauders’ reign in the region. The belief, therefore, was that Operation Amotekun’s establishment would at least frighten criminals off the land. With the security situation in Nigeria and the South-West, the operation excited a large section of Nigerians as an initiative that could curb the myriad of violence in the South-West. Instructively, sociocultural organisations across the country, including Afenifere, Ohaneze Ndigbo, Arewa Consultative Forum and Southern and Middle Belt Leaders Forum all endorsed the initiative, harping on its implications for safety and security.

Indeed, to commentators who lamented the pseudo federalism that the country has practised since the military hijack of governance in Nigeria in 1966, Operation Amotekun showed that the South-West was beginning to showcase the tenets of federalism and integration and could, on successful implementation, point the way forward to other parts of the country. However, in a move quite consistent with its attitude over the years, the Nigeria Police was conspicuously absent at the launching of the initiative. Apparently, the explanation by WNSN officials that Amotekun was not established as a substitute to the regular police failed to placate the police establishment and, as it would be seen thereafter, the Federal Government.

On Tuesday, January 14, a press release from the office of the Attorney General of the Federation and Minister of Justice, Abubakar Malami, unmasked the establishment’s disinclination to the establishment of Operation Amotekun. In the release, the Federal Government claimed that the paramilitary organisation was “illegal and runs contrary to the provisions of the Nigerian law.” It cited portions of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, 1999 (as amended), especially Item 45 of the Second Schedule  (as amended)  which “established the Army, Navy and Air Force, including the police and other numerous paramilitary organisations for the purpose of the defence of Nigeria” and concluded that “no state government, whether singly or in a group, has the legal right and competence to establish any form of organisation or agency for the defence of Nigeria or any of its constituent parts.”Malami also claimed that his office was not consulted on the matter, or he would have guided the state governments on the need for “Nigeria’s defence and corporate entity” to be “preserved at all times.”

Given the pernicious practice since 1966 of undermining the basis of the country’s existence as agreed by its founding fathers, Malami’s qualms  are understandable. Since coming on board in 2015, the government in which he serves has, time and again, expressed studied preference for the iniquitous status quo, namely the centralisation of political power at the expense of the country’s component units. It is therefore no surprise that Malami’s opinion, robed in the garb of a judicial pronouncement, is completely incongruous with the tone and tenor not only  of the country’s constitution but also of the federal system of government which it proclaims itself to be. In wording and purport, the Malami press release strives, quite arrogantly and quite erroneously, to legislate over, and overrun, elected state governments, an integral part of the component units that give life to the country and the tier of it that he serves in appointive capacity.

In this regard, it is heartening that the South-West governors, eminent legal authorities and elder statesmen have all put a lie to Malami’s spurious claims. For instance, the Ondo State governor, Mr. Rotimi Akeredolu (SAN), pointed out, quite rightly in our own view, that laws are not made in the AGF’s office, while his Oyo State counterpart, Mr. Seyi Makinde, submitted that he lacked power to ban Amotekun. On his part, human rights lawyer, Mr. Femi Falana (SAN), submitted that the claims were diversionary and hypocritical, since states like Kano and Zamfara have Hisbah Commission, whose operatives recently arrested a police officer caught with three women at a hotel. He pointed out that the AGF had no power to proscribe any organisation in the country. In any case, even the chairman of the Presidential Advisory Committee Against Corruption (PACAC), Prof Itse Sagay, a known advocate of the Buhari administration, dismissed Malami’s objections, noting that Amotekun was established by the affected governors in line with their constitutional roles as chief security officers of their states.

It is certainly a gross aberration that the Federal Government would choose to scoff at the pains that people in the South-West suffer. We find such an attempt to decree an abridgement of the aspirations of the people of the zone, draped in empty rhetoric and spurious legalese, insulting. There is no doubt that the Federal Government and its police establishment have been grossly inept, unable to tame the kidnapping, murder and violence constantly unleashed on the people of the South-West. In virtually all instances, herdsmen, whose excesses President Muhammadu Buhari and many of his officials have explained away on many occasions, were the culprits fingered in the violence. Thus, it is clear that the presidency is not a neutral party in this matter. Justifying the opposition to Amotekun on the basis of a law that is at variance with the spirit and letters of the practice of federalism is merely an excuse to abet those who inflict violence on the people. In any case, if the Federal Government has any disagreement with the establishment of the Amotekun, the best place to demonstrate this is to go to the Supreme Court to seek judicial interpretation.

More fundamentally, it is impossible for the presidency and the office of the AGF to stave off allegation of bias in this move of theirs. This is because the whole world is aware that Hisbah, the Sharia police, has been operating unfettered in the northern part of the country, together with the Civilian JTF deployed in the fight against Boko Haram. Never has any attempt been made by the Federal Government to curb their operations or cite nebulous portions of the constitution to stop their operations. The AGF and the Federal Government can only inflame passions and cause needless crisis in their attempt to impose their will on the South-West.

We urge the South-West governors to stand firmly by the people who elected them. They should not allow the Federal Government to dissuade them from the attempt to safeguard the lives and properties of their people. Their move is consistent with the practice of federalism.

Amotekun, FG and Nigeria’s federalism
Tribune Online

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US embassy’s description of Nigeria https://tribuneonlineng.com/us-embassys-description-of-nigeria/ Thu, 16 Jan 2020 01:10:02 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=284535 Tribune Online
US embassy’s description of Nigeria

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

O N its website, the US Embassy, in a piece of information meant for Americans intending to visit Nigeria, describes the country in very unflattering terms. It harps on two major albatrosses, namely crude infrastructure and poor security. Anyone familiar with the Nigerian terrain knows full well that its performance in these two areas is […]

US embassy’s description of Nigeria
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
US embassy’s description of Nigeria

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

O N its website, the US Embassy, in a piece of information meant for Americans intending to visit Nigeria, describes the country in very unflattering terms. It harps on two major albatrosses, namely crude infrastructure and poor security. Anyone familiar with the Nigerian terrain knows full well that its performance in these two areas is horrendously low. Thankfully, the embassy says so quite unapologetically.

For instance, on health, the embassy confirms that Nigeria has well-trained health professionals but lacks good health facilities. It particularly notes that many medicines are unavailable, including medications for diabetes and hypertension. It says that medicine should be purchased with utmost caution because counterfeit pharmaceuticals are a common problem and distinguishing them from genuine medications may prove difficult. The expose’ also says that Nigerian hospitals often expect immediate cash payments for the health services rendered. It thumbs down the emergency health services in the country, saying that they are practically non-existent, and circumscribed by unreliable and unsafe blood supply for transfusion. It then counsels intending visitors to Nigeria to consider Europe, South Africa or the United States itself for  treatments that require such services. It notes, quite sadly, that “ambulance services are not present throughout the country or are unreliable in most areas.”

The embassy’s observations and comments on water supply in Nigeria are instructive. As it notes, “no areas (in Nigeria) have safe tap water.” This is specifically unnerving since pipes, most of them rusted, typically bear water for public consumption from moribund reservoirs throughout the country. By the World Health Organisation (WHO) standards, the approved lifespan of water pipes is five years. Sadly, these pipes have hardly ever been replaced since they were laid decades ago, so it is proper to consider pipe-borne water wherever it exists in the country as unsafe. It is clear that even ice blocks brewed from such unsafe sources are not to be trusted for human consumption. In the areas of roads and safe traffic, the embassy is right on the money in its submission that “roads are generally in poor condition, causing damage to vehicles and contributing to hazardous traffic conditions.”

It also berates the public transport system, describing it as unsafe throughout the country. According to it, “public transportation vehicles such as buses and motorbikes are unsafe due to poor maintenance, high speed and overcrowding.” Sadly, it is not certain that governments across the country have ever considered the import of this damning description on the US website, otherwise  they would have taken concrete steps to make the country a truly modern society. The import of the description is that governance in the country has been held in abeyance over the years. As a matter of fact, this expose throws cold water on the expectations of tourists and other potential investors in the country. It is simply delusional for the government to claim to be in search of foreign direct investment from anywhere in the face of primitive infrastructure, particularly when there is no sign that efforts to change this narrative are in place.

Obviously, the US embassy’s description of Nigeria should be seen as a call to action by the country’s leadership. They should pull out of the morass of self-delusion: things are not working in the country. On their part, Nigerians must take the task of removing the country’s depraved and utterly corrupt politicians from office through the ballot box much more seriously. No truly serious country can be described in the manner that the US embassy has done with so much elan.

US embassy’s description of Nigeria
Tribune Online

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Moyinoluwa Adeyemi’s android watch and Nigerian languages https://tribuneonlineng.com/moyinoluwa-adeyemis-android-watch-and-nigerian-languages/ Wed, 15 Jan 2020 04:00:27 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=284148 Tribune Online
Moyinoluwa Adeyemi’s android watch and Nigerian languages

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

T HE exploits of a young Nigerian and computer science graduate, Moyinoluwa Adeyemi, who reportedly built a special android watch that tells time in Yoruba, shows that Nigerian youths can excel given the right climate. Moyinoluwa, a graduate of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, is a software developer and Google expert. The significance of her […]

Moyinoluwa Adeyemi’s android watch and Nigerian languages
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Moyinoluwa Adeyemi’s android watch and Nigerian languages

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

T HE exploits of a young Nigerian and computer science graduate, Moyinoluwa Adeyemi, who reportedly built a special android watch that tells time in Yoruba, shows that Nigerian youths can excel given the right climate. Moyinoluwa, a graduate of the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, is a software developer and Google expert. The significance of her achievement lies not only in the invention per se but more importantly in the deployment of one of the country’s major languages to make important contributions to the array of products and services of her employer, Swifta Systems, and she has by so doing reinforced the use of the language in the limitless world of Information and Communications Technology (ICT). Perhaps, Moyinoluwa’s innovation may not be considered as fundamentally great in that it is modelled on the android platform, but the salutary effects of its deepening of the use of the Yoruba language cannot be quantified. The seemingly little piece of invention has eloquently demonstrated that technology should not be a hindrance to cultural awareness. Indeed, technology should be a potent vehicle for the dissemination and spread of cultural values among different peoples of the world. And that in a sense makes the deepening of the use of local languages indispensable.

It is gratifying to note that a product of a Nigerian university has been able to distinguish herself and prove her mettle within the environment of a world class organisation despite the known inadequacies of the country’s educational system in the area of pragmatic academic preparation for the world of work. It has further shown, like in many other salutary instances where Nigerian youths have demonstrated exceptional resourcefulness within and especially outside the country, that the real issue militating against technological and economic progress is not the people but the defective system that tends to circumscribe the translation of their intellectual capabilities into development-driven endeavours. For instance, given the well known and outstanding exploits of some Nigerians in the country and abroad in the field of ICT, the country should be a technological hub on the African continent not in terms of importation and distribution of ICT products and services but in terms of real local production with substantial value additions by local experts. But the purposeful official intervention that could have brought this into fruition has been lacking.

Again, if the lofty ideal is achieved, it can only be sustained  if the average Nigerian tertiary institution graduate has been adequately prepared in such a way that his/her potential is unlocked and waiting to be unleashed on the work environment by way of useful innovations and inventions in his/her field of study. It is most likely that the work place contributed more significantly to Moyinoluwa’s drive for inventiveness than did the university system, but how many graduates will be fortunate enough to be employed by world class organisations?

Indeed, how many graduates working in good companies possess the extra drive to interrogate the status quo without being equipped with sound academic preparation deliberately designed to do so? The point we are making is that there is a need for a paradigm shift in the country’s education system, including school curricula and classroom instructions, because it is geared towards producing white-collar-job-seeking, instead of problem-solving, graduates. For example, the problem of limitation in the use of android watch by potential users who are only literate in Yoruba language has been solved by the invention under reference. That should be the essence of education: to provide solutions  to problems.  And naturally, where solutions are provided, there is always money to be made.  This is by no means limited to the field of ICT: all that is required is to ensure that impartation of knowledge in all fields of study is designed in such a manner that makes graduates problem-solvers, be they entrepreneurs or employees in big organisations. In this regard, the introduction of entrepreneurship courses by many tertiary institutions in the country is good and should serve the purpose of exposing students to the business side of their courses of study, but it is not a replacement for acquisition of technical and problem-solving skills from their core fields of study.

Perhaps the acquisition of these skills with a tinge of indigenous languages may prove helpful. In other words, the adoption of local languages as media of instruction in the classrooms may be considered side by side with English where practicable. The addition of indigenous languages to English for the purpose of teaching in schools has the potential to broaden the horizon of students and the versatility of their expression. There is a sense in which the knowledge of two or more languages by a user tends places him or her at a vantage position in society. And where it is impracticable to adopt local languages to teach, parents should not fail to ensure that their children and wards have a working knowledge of their indigenous languages. Certainly, Moyinoluwa did not receive computer science instructions in Yoruba at the Obafemi Awolowo University, but she understands the language and was able to use that knowledge to solve a problem. We commend Moyinoluwa Adeyemi for her invention and recommend her for emulation by other Nigerian youths.

Moyinoluwa Adeyemi’s android watch and Nigerian languages
Tribune Online

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Chukwuemeka Ike: Sunset in 2020 https://tribuneonlineng.com/chukwuemeka-ike-sunset-in-2020/ Mon, 13 Jan 2020 23:39:35 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=283598 Tribune Online
Chukwuemeka Ike: Sunset in 2020

ON Thursday, January 9, one of Nigeria’s finest and most iconic literary voices, Professor Chukwuemeka Ike, passed on at the Nnamdi Azikiwe Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra State. To say the least, the loss to the country is unquantifiable, as the departed writer made such a huge contribution to African literature and the Nigerian nation that […]

Chukwuemeka Ike: Sunset in 2020
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Chukwuemeka Ike: Sunset in 2020

ON Thursday, January 9, one of Nigeria’s finest and most iconic literary voices, Professor Chukwuemeka Ike, passed on at the Nnamdi Azikiwe Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra State. To say the least, the loss to the country is unquantifiable, as the departed writer made such a huge contribution to African literature and the Nigerian nation that many writers can only dream of. A cultural enthusiast, the late Ike was a renowned author, distinguished scholar, university administrator and traditional ruler. Ike, traditional ruler of Ndikelionwu kingdom in Orumba North Local Government Area of Anambra State, passed on after a brief illness, aged 89.

Born to a royal household, the renowned man of letters had his primary education in his native town and, from 1945 to 1950, attended Government College Umuahia, where his literary talent was nurtured.  For his tertiary education, Ike attended at the University of Ibadan where, alongside the literary giant Chinua Achebe, he was a member of the magazine club. After his degree in English and Religious Studies, he proceeded to Stanford university, United Kingdom, for his master’s degree. He was at various times a lecturer at the University of Ibadan, Registrar at the University of Nigeria, Nsukka (UNN), visiting professor at the University of Jos, Plateau State, and Registrar of the West African Examinations Council (WAEC).

Ike  achieved renown with novels such as Toads for Supper (1965), The Naked Gods, The Potter’s Wheel (1973), Sunset at Dawn (1976), Expo ‘77 (1980), The Chicken Chasers (1980) and The Bottled Leopard (1985), works which dissected various aspects of the Nigerian dilemma and addressed issues such as corruption in the academia, examination malpractices, tradition and modernity, office politics and the value of education and industry, and have engaged the attention of different generation of students, scholars and critics of African literature and post-colonial discourses. He was reputed for being a prolific writer with a great aptitude for presenting socio-cultural and political themes with amazing flexibility and linguistic dexterity and, in all of his works, he canvasses the moral imperative and frowns on corruption and oppression in all, particularly institutionalised, forms.

It is no wonder then that in his tribute to his memory, President Muhammadu Buhari described the legendary author as a great administrator, cerebral scholar and prolific writer who would always be remembered for his exceptional creativity in communicating wisdom in simple ways through books, and one whose loyalty to the nation would continue to resonate in the way he mobilised his community for civic duties and sensitised youths on the value of good education.

On his part, the Anambra State governor, Chief Willie Obiano, said that the state had lost one of its greatest assets and totems of excellence. According to him, the late Ike was always a regal presence bringing his wealth of experience to bear on the deliberations of the Traditional Rulers Council. In a related development, a former governor of the state, Mr. Peter Obi, described the death of the literary icon as a call for the celebration of a man who was good, kind and concerned about the progress of humanity, adding that he was exceptional and worthy of celebration for his liberating influence on the society through his personal conduct and the pervasive influence of his works of arts in the form of literature. Obi, recalling the foundation of a writers’ club by the author of Our Children Are Coming (1990) and Conspiracy of silence (2001) and his support for the noble project, called for its sustenance as well as the immortalisation of his legacies through the naming of monuments in his honour.

Another window into Ike’s rich world was also provided by Chief Emeka Anyaoku, a former Secretary-General of the Commonwealth of Nations, who noted that after the publication of his first novel, Toads for Supper in 1965, and seven other successive works, namely The Naked Gods, The Potter’s Wheel, Sunset at Dawn, Expo ‘77 , The Chicken Chasers, The Bottled Leopard and Our Children Are Coming, Ike unquestionably entered into the African pantheon of literary fame. He noted that as a distinguished traditional ruler, the Ikelionwu XI of Ndikelionwu was, until his death, unflinchingly devoted to the sustenance of Igbo culture and history, adding that the resuscitation of society through the vehicle of history and culture was one task that he never shied away from, and one to which he uncompromisingly deployed his literary creativity to serve.

We mourn the passing of Professor Chukwuemeka Ike and wish his family, friends, Anambra State and the country in general the fortitude to bear the loss. We urge the government to ensure that the values to which he devoted his existence are never eroded.

Chukwuemeka Ike: Sunset in 2020
Tribune Online

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283598
Buhari on his successor https://tribuneonlineng.com/buhari-on-his-successor/ Mon, 13 Jan 2020 02:51:39 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=283304 Tribune Online
Buhari on his successor

Buhari

The statement credited to President Muhammadu Buhari to the effect that he would ensure that he would not be  succeeded in 2023 by looters is yet another example of the the persisting mindset of the current president who calls himself a converted democrat. This is in spite of the attempt by Femi Adesina, his Special […]

Buhari on his successor
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Buhari on his successor

Buhari

The statement credited to President Muhammadu Buhari to the effect that he would ensure that he would not be  succeeded in 2023 by looters is yet another example of the the persisting mindset of the current president who calls himself a converted democrat. This is in spite of the attempt by Femi Adesina, his Special Adviser on Media, to explain it away as no more than the wish and expectation of the president that he is not succeeded by looters.

To be sure, no society would rightly support the takeover of government by looters. But this is a situation that the Nigerian society has already taken care of through the constitutional provision barring convicted offenders from standing for election. That the Nigerian government would not be taken over by looters is not at the behest or good act of President Buhari or through his wish and expectation, but through the constitutional provision ensuring that convicted looters cannot stand for elections. And given that convicting any Nigerian of the crime of looting is also essentially reserved for the courts, it means that President Buhari is really interested in acting outside of the existing rules by imagining that there are looters that he is concerned with outside of conviction in the courts of law. For if he is only concerned with court-certified looters, who in any case are the only looters known to Nigerian law, it is not his place to debar such from taking over government as they are already barred from contesting for any elective posts by the existing rules in the country.

It is, of course, possible for anyone interested to seek to engage in mobilising voters for or against particular interests, or to engage in enlightenment campaigns to raise the consciousness of the voting public, but all this would be within the purview of seeing the voters and the people as the ultimate determinants of those who are to govern them under a democracy and not through the powers and antics of a sitting president or some other anti-democratic interests and forces. The point is that President Buhari has been elected to govern Nigeria for the next four years and his responsibility in that regard does not include determining for Nigerians who should be their president after him. That responsibility is squarely that of the Nigerian people as voters in the next presidential election and it would be their right to vote in any of the valid contestants at that point, regardless of the opinion or sentiment or even preference of President Buhari and also those asking him to venture into what is not within his powers.  For, pray, when does it become the duty of a sitting president in a democracy to determine who would become the next president when that is firmly the duty of voters?

The implication of the above is that President Buhari and all those, like Pastor Tunde Bakare, urging him to get involved in the scheming to ensure that a particular set of people are not those who succeed him in 2023 are yet to strip themselves of the military essence of looking to a super person to help determine and make major decisions for the society even while pretending to operate under a democratic system. This is because in a real and true democratic system, ultimate power resides with the people who as voters are empowered to elect whosoever they want into all elective offices, including the presidency.

The idea of a sitting president determining those who could succeed him/her is a throwback to the military era and that is an era that Nigerians have roundly rejected and supplanted with the ongoing democratic dispensation. Nigerians would definitely not take kindly to the attempt to impose a military veneer on their hard-earned democratic practice and should therefore be spared this back-door romance with military autocracy. It is the responsibility of Nigerians to determine those to govern them and they have not ceded, and are not going to cede, that responsibility to President Buhari under any guise.

Buhari on his successor
Tribune Online

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Boiling meat with paracetamol! https://tribuneonlineng.com/boiling-meat-with-paracetamol/ Fri, 10 Jan 2020 03:50:11 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=282468 Tribune Online
Boiling meat with paracetamol!

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

The Osun State government recently called on caterers and food vendors in the state to stop the pernicious practice of using paracetamol to tenderise meat and using bleaching detergents for cassava processing, ostensibly to induce whiteness in the popular foods, fufu and gari. The warning was issued in Osogbo at a joint news conference addressed […]

Boiling meat with paracetamol!
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Boiling meat with paracetamol!

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

The Osun State government recently called on caterers and food vendors in the state to stop the pernicious practice of using paracetamol to tenderise meat and using bleaching detergents for cassava processing, ostensibly to induce whiteness in the popular foods, fufu and gari. The warning was issued in Osogbo at a joint news conference addressed by the Special Adviser on Public Health to the state governor, Siji Olamiju, and the state Commissioner for Information and Civic Orientation, Mrs. Funke Egbemode, on the harmful effects of the practices on vital organs of the body such as the liver, kidneys, heart and the small intestines. Olamiju, who disclosed that the dangerous trend was recently uncovered by public health surveillance volunteers assigned to visit primary health centres across the state, urged the perpetrators to desist from the practices which he said portended great danger to the health of consumers. He noted that hypo, a bleaching agent meant for laundry, was not even supposed to come into contact with the human skin.

On her part, Egbemode disclosed that in embarking on public sensitisation on the issue across the state, the government wanted to put paid to the adverse health implications associated with the illicit practices over the years. While noting that paracetamol, a pain-relieving medication,  was being used to boil meat and process tough cow leg in order to cut costs and to reduce cooking  time, she lamented the use of hypo detergent to process cassava, a practice which she said could cause can cause slow and instalmental  death.

Body parts for N90,000!

It is indeed strange that the typical Nigerian practice of cutting corners has been taken to the culinary level.  Across all strata of the Nigerian society, people cut corners without minding the cost in terms of social dysfunction and dislocation. With respect to the issue under reference, though, kudos must be given to the Osun State government for bringing such a matter of serious national concern to public knowledge. As it were, an unknown number of Nigerians would have consumed paracetamol-boiled meat and hypo-processed gari over the years and inherited the associated health problems without the slightest inkling of the real sources of their medical challenges. This is why the Osun State government, as well as its counterparts across the country, must step up their act and ensure that the pernicious practices are brought to a halt, including via legislation, where necessary. Indeed, some caterers and food vendors who have hitherto not engaged in the devious practice of tenderising meat through unorthodox means might even choose to experiment with the paracetamol method now that it has become public knowledge, and in order to cut corners. State and local governments must therefore ensure that restauranteurs, caterers and food vendors abide by the approved practices.

As experts have warned, the dangers of paracetamol toxicity include liver and kidney failure. Paracetamol is metabolised primarily in the liver into toxic and non-toxic products. Some final products are inactive, non-toxic, and eventually excreted by the kidneys. However, there is an intermediate product that is toxic and induces acute liver failure. When the drug is used for cooking, it is broken down into aminophenol, which is highly toxic to the kidney. It is a fact that high consumption of analgesics over many years is an established cause of kidney failure. According to the Nigerian Association of Nephrology, about 25 million Nigerians have kidney failure. This statistics is distressing, to say the least, and there is no need to further compound the burden by creating new cases.

According to nutritionists, tough meat can be tenderised by slicing, velveting, soaking in a mixture of cornstarch, rice wine, salt, sugar and egg whites, marinating with vinegar or citrus juices, soaking in salt-water solution, and even pounding, before cooking. While all of these methods admittedly have time implications, whatever discomfort that may originate with respect to time is much more than compensated for by safety. We therefore urge local and state governments to step up enlightenment and advocacy campaigns along these lines. In the same vein, the National Agency for Food Drugs Administration and Control (NAFDAC) should take more than a passing interest in the ongoing advocacy. It should liaise with state governments and other relevant agencies and roll out enlightenment programmes on food and drugs practices. There is no doubt that a host of other pernicious food and drug practices are yet to come to light. They should come to light, which is why we urge academic institutions, as part of their social responsibilities, to be part of the advocacy. The battle may be tough, but it must be won.

 

Nigerian Tribune

Boiling meat with paracetamol!
Tribune Online

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Body parts for N90,000! https://tribuneonlineng.com/body-parts-for-n90000/ Wed, 08 Jan 2020 23:29:55 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=281936 Tribune Online
Body parts for N90,000!

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IN yet another dastardly event that highlighted the heightening level of barbarity in the country, a certain Segun Olaniyi recently murdered his former lover, Mrs Abosede Iyanda, and sold her body parts for the total sum of N90,000. His customers who allegedly made the purchases included a pastor who claimed that he needed the body […]

Body parts for N90,000!
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Body parts for N90,000!

paracetamol, Body parts, pneumonia, Children, Nigerians, health, Nigeria, torture centres, houses, mental health, health, for, refineries, Mobolaji Johnson, His Excellency, Sanwo-Olu, pregnant,Ekiti, Bill, law, sexual relationships, pregnant girls, , private Visit, law, rail transport, bad roads, federal highways, oil production, PTDF, civil servants, bayelsa state government, public schools, primary and secondary schools, teachers, operation positive identification, Arrest, Nigerian Army, Air force, Nigeria, Sokoto, various degrees of injuries, mabera area of sokoto, girlfriend, Nigerian Army, Editorial, JAMB, national identity database, national identity, National Identity Number, NIN, warning, inec chairman, professor Attahiru Jegapersonal effects, Airport, Customs, duties, Customs duties, import tariffs, pay tax, Communications ministry, digital economy, approval of the name, correctional service, Buhari, empowerment, school feeding programme, vice president, social investment, Labour, Ngige, white-collar jobs, unemployed nigerians, unemployed, Islamic schools, federal state and local governments, kaduna and katsina, no-hunger, Food, minister of agriculture, nigerian people, Senate, cost of governance, number of senators, Okorocha, Senate, fiscal prudence, Buhari, categories of government, federal government, minister of works, federal highways, tollgates, sex for favours, Laptops, Football boots, Victor Osimhen, housing crisis, AMCON, sanctions , Fulani, Allen Onyema, Mugabe, budget , NDDC, federal roads, marriage, dual citizenship, border closure, online radio, cattle rearing, Ekweremadu, food, prisons , VAT, IMN, ministerial nominees, buhari, CJN, ports, kenya, Ruga settlements, DSS , Nigeria, marijuana, ban on okada, e-border project, drug cartels, life pension, Ngige, revenue collection, Magdalene Yohanna, investors, open defecation, state police, Sex romp, most miserable, Cyclone Idai, small scale enterprises, Nigerian, Ogoni, out-of-school children, NSCDC, Kajuru, Ita faji, No smoking day, oil marketers, FIFA, Leah Sharibu, customs, police, elections, tariff, El-Rufai, Health, nigerian medical association, NMA, health sector

IN yet another dastardly event that highlighted the heightening level of barbarity in the country, a certain Segun Olaniyi recently murdered his former lover, Mrs Abosede Iyanda, and sold her body parts for the total sum of N90,000. His customers who allegedly made the purchases included a pastor who claimed that he needed the body parts to effect miracles, an Islamic cleric who needed them for money rituals, a medical doctor, and others. Mrs Iyanda had earlier reportedly lied to her husband that she was embarking on a visit to her mother, but she actually paid a visit to her former lover to seek spiritual help in improving her business fortunes. After she went missing on October 15, 2019, her father petitioned the office of the Inspector General of Police, from where the case was assigned to the Intelligence Response Team (IRT) for investigation.

According to media reports, the IRT operatives tracked Olaniyi down to his office and he later confessed his deeds, mentioning the names of the accomplices in the murder of Abosede Iyanda and the customers who made purchases. The remains of the 30-year-old victim were sold for much less than the cost of a well-fed ram. It is lamentable that some members of the Nigerian society have sunk to this base level in their evaluation of human life despite their pretences to enlightenment and civilisation. Many Nigerians are basically just a whistle away from barbarity in the heat of existential pressures. The much touted sanctity of human life is a ruse: the hordes of cannibals lurking in the recesses of the streets and looking for the next victim to devour do not pretend that life means anything to them.

Avoid supremacy battles to achieve development, Olugbon charges Ogbomoso obas

The sordid details of Olaniyi’s confessions reveal the raw, basic instincts of a predator. His activities were all about food and survival, and it didn’t matter who perished in the process. Admittedly, though, as existence and survival become harder, the society tends to compromise its values, setting upon the weak and the vulnerable and destroying them. There is thus a humongous task ahead for the authorities. Not only must they bring characters like Segun Olaniyi to book, they must stem the tide of social predation in all forms. There is a point at which individuals become helpless and cannot be trusted to take charge of their lives any more, on account of the existential pressures confronting them. Nigeria has reached a tipping point and must return quickly to sanity.

The rate of ritual murders in the country is alarming. The metro sections of the country’s dailies are perennially awash with the sordid details of killings and mutilations. The authorities should be concerned about the kind of society they are ruling over when a medical doctor negotiates the prices of human parts with a native doctor and pastors are partakers in the trade in human flesh. It is tough enough to contend with the regular crimes, but when existence and survival begin to be premised on a compromise of the society’s humane values, then anarchy looms. The regression of the Nigerian society into barbarity and cannibalism is  so shameful as to make the continuing disavowal of Joseph Conrad’s novel, Heart of Darkness, by literary critics a hollow ritual. The horrid events happening in the country certainly are a dent on its supposed membership of the modern world.

Nigerian Tribune

Body parts for N90,000!
Tribune Online

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