Book Review – Tribune Online https://tribuneonlineng.com Breaking News in Nigeria Today Sun, 03 Nov 2019 19:40:45 +0100 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3 https://tribuneonlineng.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/logo.jpg Book Review – Tribune Online https://tribuneonlineng.com 32 32 118125416 One Minute Manager https://tribuneonlineng.com/one-minute-manager/ Mon, 04 Nov 2019 02:15:20 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=261154 Tribune Online
One Minute Manager

one minute manager, book, people

This book is unlike any other book of its genre. It is written in a story format. Opening pages aroused such kind of curiosity that it made me jump straight into it and I couldn’t keep it down unless I had gobbled it up all. The story begins with a young man searching out for […]

One Minute Manager
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One Minute Manager

one minute manager, book, people

This book is unlike any other book of its genre. It is written in a story format. Opening pages aroused such kind of curiosity that it made me jump straight into it and I couldn’t keep it down unless I had gobbled it up all.

The story begins with a young man searching out for an effective manager. His search leads him across the world and he keeps meeting managers who he categorizes into two types. – Autocratic who define themselves as hard-nosed, realistic, profit-minded and who like to be on top of every situation. And Democratic who define themselves as participative, supportive, considerate and humanistic. – Both the breeds pride themselves in their result minded focus and people oriented focus respectively and this bemused him. Why? Because the autocratic ones predictably had their companies prosper but also had higher turnover; while the democratic ones had happy employees around but company suffered. It was as if managers of the world were primarily interested either in results or in people.

They told me that they wanted me to have children for them, so that the children can be brought up to become jihadists like them —Phoebe Musa

The young man defined Effective managers as those who manage themselves and the people they work with so that both the organization and the people profit from their presence. He was at loss since he couldn’t find them easily. He finally stumbles across one who is willing to share his secret. This one called himself the ONE MINUTE MANAGER and he was quite a character. The One Minute Manager listens while his people review and analyze what they’ve accomplished, the problems they had, and what still needs to be accomplished. Yet he doesn’t believe in participating in any of his people’s decision-making. He is neither results-oriented, nor people oriented. He cares about people and results equally. The man is an admired leader that is highly spoken of by his employees, his three secrets being the key to his success. These secrets to productive and efficient managing are revealed to the young man and they are as follows.

One Minute Goal Setting: The basic philosophy of the One Minute Goal Setting is no surprises; everyone knows what is expected from the beginning. This is what it says,

  • Agree on your goals.
  • See what good behaviour looks like.
  • Write out each of your goals on a single page using less than 250 words.
  • Read and re-read each goal, which takes only a minute or so each time.
  • Take a minute every once in a while out of your day to look at your performance, and
  • See whether or not your behavior matches your goal.

 

One Minute Praisings: Here basic aim is to help people reach their full potential. Catch them doing something right! It works when you,

Tell people right from the start that you are going to let them know how they are doing.

Praise them immediately.

Tell people what exactly they did right – be specific.

Tell people how good you feel about what they did right, and how it helps the organization and the other people who work there.

Stop for a moment of silence to let them feel how good you feel.

Encourage them to do more of the same.

Shake hands or touch people in a way that makes it clear that you support their success in the organization.

One Minute Reprimand: Main purpose here is to eliminate the behavior and keep the person. This consists of the reprimand and the reassurance, both being equally important. It will work well when you,

Tell people beforehand that you are going to let them know how they are doing an in no uncertain terms.

Reprimand people immediately.

Tell people what they did wrong – be specific.

Tell people how you feel about what they did wrong – and in no uncertain terms.

Stop for a few seconds of uncomfortable silence to let them feel how you feel.

Shake hands, or touch them in a way that lets them know you are honestly on their side.

Remind them how much you value them.

Reaffirm that you think well of them but not of their performance in this situation.

Realize that when the reprimand is over, it’s over.

 

Nigerian Tribune

One Minute Manager
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Review of Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts https://tribuneonlineng.com/review-of-brene-browns-dare-to-lead-brave-work-tough-conversations-whole-hearts/ Mon, 28 Oct 2019 00:45:19 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=258770 Tribune Online
Review of Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts

Brené Brown, Dare to Lead, leadership, social work

Dare to Lead is the latest New York Times bestseller from Brené Brown. Perhaps the most well-known social worker of contemporary times, Brown is known for her storytelling, numerous publications, TED talks, and down-to-earth style. Her latest offering focuses on leadership. For Brown social work fans, Dare to Lead, the result of extensive research with […]

Review of Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts
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Review of Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts

Brené Brown, Dare to Lead, leadership, social work

Dare to Lead is the latest New York Times bestseller from Brené Brown. Perhaps the most well-known social worker of contemporary times, Brown is known for her storytelling, numerous publications, TED talks, and down-to-earth style. Her latest offering focuses on leadership. For Brown social work fans, Dare to Lead, the result of extensive research with business leaders and a fair amount of self-reflection, is a compelling addition to the psychology of leadership.

Brown intends for the book to be a quick and easy read. However, each chapter holds such rich, engaging, and thought-provoking content, the reader needs time to absorb, re-read, and consider one’s own work setting. Some of us have experienced inadequate or inappropriate leadership in our agencies that left us feeling as if we were the square peg in the agency’s round hole. Dare to Lead is part naming of the experience of working in the contemporary workspace and part challenge to develop whole-hearted leadership.

Nothern elder advises Igbo on how to clinch Presidency in 2023

For example, in the introduction, Brown identifies ten behaviors and cultural organizational issues that leaders identify as “getting in our way” (p. 7-9). All of the items are linked to emotional issues, such as diminishing trust, fear of failure, shame and blame, rushing to solutions, using work time to manage problematic behaviors or agency problems rather than focusing on the organization’s work. Sound familiar?

Brown defines a leader as “anyone who takes responsibility for finding the potential in people and processes, and who has the courage to develop that potential” (p. 4). Using this definition, Dare to Lead is highly applicable to social work supervision, social work agencies, and social work practice.

Overarchingly, she maintains that vulnerability is the key to good leadership, and that organizations have a responsibility to create a culture where there is psychological safety to support worker vulnerability. Vulnerability is defined as “the emotion that we experience during times of uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure” (p. 19). Using Brown’s definition, the reader must let go of the presumption that vulnerability is the act of sharing of intimate personal details in a work setting. Rather, vulnerability involves opening oneself to how others in the organization are experiencing you, being open to change, being open to creativity, and being open to failure. Brown outlines six myths of vulnerability and makes the case that without vulnerability, successful work outcomes are not possible.

She re-introduces concepts such as “rumbling,” outlined in other work but used in Dare to Lead as the willingness to have difficult, honest, and vulnerable conversations about how work is approached. Brown outlines specific strategies for teams, including each person “owning our parts,” examining false dichotomies (i.e. operations and creativity always as competing concepts) that limit each person’s ability to be one’s full self, and the value of apologies in the workplace.

Section Three of the book speaks particularly to “armored leadership,” which functions to protect the vulnerable self, and “daring leadership,” which functions to serve the organization and those who work for and are served by the organization.

Brown’s themes of vulnerability, isolation, fear, connection, and trust are consistent with other theoretical approaches, including Relational-Cultural Theory. These themes could not be more relevant in contemporary times and in contemporary agencies where there is often overwhelming focus on compliance, measurability, and technology, and increasingly, what feels like little focus on the client experience. Dare to Lead challenges us to think differently about the components of quality leadership, a message that resonates with social workers.

Nigerian Tribune

Review of Brené Brown’s Dare to Lead: Brave Work. Tough Conversations. Whole Hearts
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Review of Nir Eyal’s indistractable: How to control your attention and choose your life https://tribuneonlineng.com/review-of-nir-eyals-indistractable-how-to-control-your-attention-and-choose-your-life/ Mon, 21 Oct 2019 03:15:08 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=256252 Tribune Online
Review of Nir Eyal’s indistractable: How to control your attention and choose your life

indistractable, eyal

In Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life,” Nir Eyal describes a 2014 study published in Science in which participants were asked to “sit in a room and think” for 15 minutes. Inside this room was a simple device that dispensed small electric shocks. When asked before the session, everyone said they’d […]

Review of Nir Eyal’s indistractable: How to control your attention and choose your life
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Review of Nir Eyal’s indistractable: How to control your attention and choose your life

indistractable, eyal

In Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life,” Nir Eyal describes a 2014 study published in Science in which participants were asked to “sit in a room and think” for 15 minutes. Inside this room was a simple device that dispensed small electric shocks. When asked before the session, everyone said they’d pay to avoid being mildly shocked, yet when left alone with nothing else to do, 67% of the men and 25% of the women intentionally shocked themselves. If we would rather give ourselves a jolt than endure 15 minutes of boredom, how can we expect to resist a smartphone full of apps expressly designed to keep us engrossed?

In his previous book, “Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products” (2014), Mr. Eyal, who spent years in the video-game industry, detailed how app developers get us addicted to their products. Now the author offers some helpful behavioral and time-management strategies to help us re-engage with real life.

Our aversion to boredom might be universal, but the reasons for our tech addictions are very personal and “unless we deal with the root causes of our distraction,” Mr. Eyal asserts, “we’ll continue to find ways to distract ourselves.” That’s an important point that isn’t often made. Mr. Eyal borrows techniques from Jonathan Bricker, a psychologist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, who recommends becoming mindful of the internal triggers that derail you, then writing them down. Are you plagued by feelings of anxiety, frustration, incompetence? Mr. Bricker encourages riding out those feelings before acting on the impulse to, say, check Instagram for likes. (Mr. Eyal makes himself wait a full 10 minutes before giving in to an urge.) Similar techniques when used in a smoking-cessation study proved effective: Participants who acknowledged and explored their cravings quit at double the rate of those in the American Lung Association’s best-performing program.

Once we’ve made peace with our own internal discomfort, it’s time to tackle the external triggers—the incessant notifications, the unrelenting messages and the stubborn google itches. Mr. Eyal preaches the gospel of timeboxing, a popular productivity technique for deciding in advance what you’re going to do and when you’re going to do it, and then sticking to the schedule. After filling your calendar with boxes, you have a blueprint for how you intend to spend each day. “Keeping a timeboxed schedule is the only way to know if you’re distracted,” Mr. Eyal writes. “If you’re not spending your time doing what you’d planned, you’re off track.” Watching YouTube is fine as long as you’ve scheduled for it, but checking work email if you should be drafting that proposal isn’t.

Davido, Chioma welcome 1st baby in London

Writers are infamous for taking drastic measures to eliminate digital distractions, using antiquated machines to banish the internet altogether. The novelist Jonathan Franzen, for instance, used superglue to permanently block the Ethernet port on his obsolete Dell laptop. Mr. Eyal takes a Marie Kondo-style approach to eliminating digital clutter—unsubscribing from the newsletters he never reads and trashing the apps he never uses—but also likes to fight technology with technology, applying various apps and browser extensions to avoid or bypass attention bait such as ads, suggested videos and social-media feeds. For the less tech-savvy among us, Mr. Eyal has another suggestion: establishing pacts with friends or colleagues to stay focused on a task, leveraging a predigital form of social pressure that has largely disappeared in the age of the computer.

Yet Mr. Eyal’s tactics are easier to put into practice if you’re self-employed or in the C-suite; most office workers aren’t the masters of their own schedules. Even if you follow the author’s advice and convince your manager to support your timeboxing routine, impromptu meetings can wreak havoc on plans for focused work. And regardless of how understanding your co-workers may be, they might take exception to waiting an hour (or four) for a response to their messages. Timeboxers who attach a red do-not-disturb card (a cutout feature of the book) on their computers may earn harsher labels than “indistractable.”

Ultimately, it may fall on the younger generation to repair the damage we’ve done to a healthy work-life balance. Parents can prepare their children for the challenge by talking to them about the hazards of tech overuse—expectations of instant gratification, social isolation and, yes, unproductive distraction—but also by empowering them to set reasonable limits. “The more you make decisions with them,” Mr. Eyal writes, “the more willing they will be to listen to your guidance.” Of course, that can only happen if you, too, put your phone down.

Review of Nir Eyal’s indistractable: How to control your attention and choose your life
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The leader who had no title https://tribuneonlineng.com/the-leader-who-had-no-title/ Mon, 14 Oct 2019 02:20:04 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=253693 Tribune Online
The leader who had no title

leader

Review by Michael Ray Hopkin “We all need to lead where we are planted and shine where we now find ourselves.” According to Robin Sharma, the author of The Leader Who Had No Title: A Modern Fable on Real Success in Business and in Life, anyone can be a leader. Too many people go to work with […]

The leader who had no title
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The leader who had no title

leader

Review by Michael Ray Hopkin

“We all need to lead where we are planted and shine where we now find ourselves.” According to Robin Sharma, the author of The Leader Who Had No Title: A Modern Fable on Real Success in Business and in Life, anyone can be a leader. Too many people go to work with the mindset that to be a leader they need to work their way up the company ladder, get the title or position they seek, and then they can be leaders. This is the wrong approach according to Sharma.

The book is written in a business fable style. The story is good and somewhat engaging. The leadership principles that surface in the story make the book worth reading. The foundation principle is self-leadership. Anyone who understands this can lead regardless of his or her official title in an organization. According to Sharma, “leaders are those individuals who do the things that failures aren’t willing to do–even though they might not like doing them either.” Too many people pay the sad costs of mediocrity and forego the spectacular rewards of being a leader.

In the story, the main character (Blake) has conversations with four unorthodox leaders. Each of these individuals works in a position that — based on conventional wisdom — would not be considered a leadership position. Each conversation brings out key principles that can help “ordinary” people become true leaders:

  • You need no title to be a leader: Success (business and personal) is something that’s consciously created. To lead without a title “you will have to be unrealistically persistent and wildly courageous.”
  • Turbulent times build great leaders: Challenging times in both business and life give us great opportunities to learn and transform ourselves. “Problems and difficult days are actually good for you.”
  • The deeper your relationships, the stronger your leadership: “Leave every single person who intersects your path better, happier, and more engaged than you found them.” Time spent forming deep relationships–in all aspects of life–will pay dividends down the road.
  • To be a great leader, first become a great person: Training and strengthening your inner leader will help you perform at extraordinary levels. The key is learning to lead yourself. In our world we define success by the things we have, not by the people we’ve become. The more self-awareness we develop the more likely we are to grow and help others.

The leader who had no title
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Review of Rajeev Peshawaria’s Open Source Leadership: Reinventing Management When There Is No More Business As Usual https://tribuneonlineng.com/review-of-rajeev-peshawarias-open-source-leadership-reinventing-management-when-there-is-no-more-business-as-usual/ Mon, 07 Oct 2019 02:53:38 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=251449 Tribune Online
Review of Rajeev Peshawaria’s Open Source Leadership: Reinventing Management When There Is No More Business As Usual

Leadership

As the nature of how companies do business changes, what about time-honored managerial styles? Do they need to change as well? Open Source Leadership is a newly published book by business author former Coca-Cola and Morgan Stanley executive and Rajeev Peshawaria.  Published by McGraw-Hill, Peshawaria’s book contends that many of the many management practices that […]

Review of Rajeev Peshawaria’s Open Source Leadership: Reinventing Management When There Is No More Business As Usual
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Review of Rajeev Peshawaria’s Open Source Leadership: Reinventing Management When There Is No More Business As Usual

Leadership

As the nature of how companies do business changes, what about time-honored managerial styles? Do they need to change as well?

Open Source Leadership is a newly published book by business author former Coca-Cola and Morgan Stanley executive and Rajeev Peshawaria.  Published by McGraw-Hill, Peshawaria’s book contends that many of the many management practices that persist today are no longer well-aligned with the reality of current workplaces, current employees … or even society in general.

One fundamental change that has happened just in the past generation is what Preshawaria labels “uber-connectivity.” Thanks to the Internet, mobile phones and other communication technologies, people are able to access information on nearly any topic and obtain answers to any question — wherever they are and whenever they want.

According to the author, this near-limitless access to information empowers people to an unprecedented degree – and it narrows the gulf between “experts” and “regular folks.”

As for “guru-worship” – the inclination of at least some people to seek out and learn from the soothsayers in the business world … that’s yesterday’s bread.

Lest Peshawaria be accused of being what he himself declares irrelevant, he remarks, “The guru is dead. Long live the Google.”

Couple uber-connectivity with increasing world population plus the concentration of that population in urban areas, and the result is companies that are now able to source talent and knowledge from wherever they exist.

How do these changes affect the theory and practice of business management?

In Peshawaria’s view, company leaders are still called upon to provide steadfast leadership about “purpose and values,” while at the same time acting with “compassion, humility and respect for people.”

Some of this may sound something like the “autocratic” management style that was prevalent in business until the 1980s – but not exactly. At the same time, it’s different from the “all-inclusive” democratic style that became ascendant in the world of business during the past three decades.  Let’s call it a hybrid.

One other important factor addressed by Peshawaria in his book is that employee motivation remains a nettlesome issue for companies – and far more complex than most management theories and stratagems account for.

One prescription from Peshawaria is for managers to dump the notion of giving “stretch goals” to all employees in an attempt to foster high performance. He argues that stretch goals work only for “the small percentage of employees [who] have the creativity, innovation and drive to truly relish and achieve stretch goals at any one point in time.”

According to Peshawaria, for the majority of employees stretch goals end up “causing stress, anxiety, or poorly thought-out behavior.”

Review of Rajeev Peshawaria’s Open Source Leadership: Reinventing Management When There Is No More Business As Usual
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The inside out revolution https://tribuneonlineng.com/the-inside-out-revolution/ Mon, 30 Sep 2019 01:49:48 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=249385 Tribune Online
The inside out revolution

revolution, inside out

Michael Neill had this to say about our societies outside thinking mindset: “The prevailing model in our culture is that our experience of life is created from the outside in – that is, what happens to us on the outside determines our experience on the inside. People or circumstances ‘make’ us happy, angry, sad, fearful, […]

The inside out revolution
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The inside out revolution

revolution, inside out

Michael Neill had this to say about our societies outside thinking mindset:

“The prevailing model in our culture is that our experience of life is created from the outside in – that is, what happens to us on the outside determines our experience on the inside. People or circumstances ‘make’ us happy, angry, sad, fearful, or loving, and the game of life is to find, attract, create, or manifest the right people and circumstances in order to have more of the good feelings and fewer of the bad ones.”

Author Neill bases his writing on what he calls The Three Principles. They are:

  1. Mind.

There is an energy and intelligence behind life.

  1. Consciousness.

The capacity to be aware and experience life is innate in human beings. It is a universal phenomenon. Our level of awareness in any given moment determines the quality of our experience.

States, LG get 85% of VAT, Nigerians should demand accountability ―…

  1. Thought.

We create our individual experience of reality via the vehicle of thought. Thought is the missing link between the formless world of pure potentiality and the created world of form.

Remember- and this is very important – you’re only one thought away from happiness, you’re only one thought away from sadness. The secret lies in Thought. It’s the missing link that everybody in this world is looking for.

This last point is the secret missing link that bears repeating again. We have a selective choice by way of thought whether to experience happiness, something positive and meaningful, or, negative and sad, dragging you down emotionally. The element of thought is one of interpretation. What we choose to do with potential by then giving a form to it.

I loved this next quote by Neill’s mentor, Syd Banks that has to do with that transformative moment: “When you are ready, you will find what you’re looking for. I don’t care who you are. I don’t care where you are. If you’re in the middle of the Sahara Desert…and it’s time for you to find the answer, the right person will appear in the middle of the desert and let you know.”

At the end of each chapter, Michael Neil summarizes the points of that chapter. At the end of chapter eight, The Paradox of Results, he synthesizes what he has written about into these five points.

√   The moment we see that every feeling is just the shadow of a thought, we stop being scared of our feelings and just feel them.

√   We’re playing with the house’s money. There’s nothing real at stake. The only thing we have to lose is the illusion that something   outside us can make us happy, safe and secure.

√   When you’re playing to play, being alive is the best game in town.

√   Humility isn’t thinking less of yourself; it’s thinking of yourself less.

√   How things ultimately turn out isn’t up to us. It never was. But if we do our bit and play our part, it’s remarkable how far we can go.

The difference in making a change in one’s mindset in how we view things can indeed unchain us from limitations we bind ourselves up in. The following observation by Ludwig Wittgenstein offered in the book is a sublime one. “A man will be imprisoned in a room with a door that’s unlocked and opens inwards as long as it does not occur to him to pull rather than push.”

The inside out revolution
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Review of Marcus Buckingham’s StandOut https://tribuneonlineng.com/review-of-marcus-buckinghams-standout/ Mon, 16 Sep 2019 02:35:49 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=245331 Tribune Online
Review of Marcus Buckingham’s StandOut

One of my idols in the business book and speaker world is Marcus Buckingham. He has been the leader in the strengths movement for the past decade, publishing bestsellers such as “First, Break All The Rules” and “Now, Discover Your Strengths.” Together his books have sold more than 3.7 million copies in several languages. His […]

Review of Marcus Buckingham’s StandOut
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Review of Marcus Buckingham’s StandOut

One of my idols in the business book and speaker world is Marcus Buckingham. He has been the leader in the strengths movement for the past decade, publishing bestsellers such as “First, Break All The Rules” and “Now, Discover Your Strengths.” Together his books have sold more than 3.7 million copies in several languages. His career first started at Gallup as a Senior Researcher and now he is the founder of The Marcus Buckingham Company. He is one of the top management gurus in the world and a highly praised speaker, who has spoken at major companies such as Best Buy, Disney and Toyota.

His latest book is called Standout: The Groundbreaking New Strengths Assessment from the Leader of the Strengths Revolution. The book is interlinked with the StandOut assessment, which unveils your two key strength roles, which will help you become more successful in the workplace. You can take the individual assessment, which costs $15.00 or if you purchase the book you will get a key. The assessment has been taken by over a quarter of a million people so far!

After taking the assessment, you should learn about which two roles were selected for you based on your answers. Here is more information about each of the nine roles that could define your success:

Connector – Individuals who see the world as a web of relationships and connect with people constantly. These individuals realize that people with different strengths can bond together to accomplish great things. In order to be successful as a connector, you need to learn as much as you can about the people around you and find opportunities to collaborate.

Provider – This role matches my personality the most. I’m always wondering how I can support my community and give value to others, in the form of connections and resources. Providers have a good sense of others feelings, are trusted peers, and defend other people’s actions.

Advisor – You are the subject matter expert and the one that people go to for advice on a certain topic. As the expert, you are constantly reading and learning as much as you can so that you can provide that information to others.

Creator – Before asking for help, you come up with ideas. You enjoy alone time to think and be clear on what you need to do. You take pride in your ideas, don’t like surprises, and you are relentless in your actions.

Equalizer – These people feel that the entire universe needs to be aligned. They strive for balance in everything and you expect a lot from everyone. If someone doesn’t do their job, you will notify them of the issue directly.

Influencer – You get people to act based on what you recommend. Your goal is always to move someone else to action through persuasiveness, charm, and other methods. Influencers aren’t patient, have selective listening based on what you want to hear, and you’re very direct.

Pioneer – These individuals are all about “what’s next.” They are excited by things they haven’t done before and are intrigued by new experiences. They don’t fear failure or uncertainty and are very action-oriented.

Stimulator – Those who have high energy and evoke it in others. You elevate the energy in the room, people cling to you, and you make things happen. Other people will take action because they follow you as a leader.

Teacher – You focus on learning from everything you do, see and hear in life. You’re a good listener and you pay attention to what other people say, without interrupting them. You act like a coach in how you try to develop the people around you.

The StandOut assessment is a great tool that will give you insight into what your strengths are that you can focus on at work. It will help you realize how you come across to others since it’s based on real life situations. The people you work with already get a sense of these strengths from you so it’s important you take the assessment and read the book to understand what you offer them.

Review of Marcus Buckingham’s StandOut
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Rising Strong by Brené Brown https://tribuneonlineng.com/rising-strong-by-brene-brown/ Mon, 09 Sep 2019 00:35:19 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=242923 Tribune Online
Rising Strong by Brené Brown

Rising Strong

Like Dr. Brené Brown’s previous works, Rising Strong is a prescriptive and deeply personal work. Dr. Brown practices what she preaches, meaning that she approaches her books with a sense of vulnerability, introspection, and courage that few other researchers would dare. Based on extensive qualitative research, Dr. Brown develops three steps to learn from failure, […]

Rising Strong by Brené Brown
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Rising Strong by Brené Brown

Rising Strong

Like Dr. Brené Brown’s previous works, Rising Strong is a prescriptive and deeply personal work. Dr. Brown practices what she preaches, meaning that she approaches her books with a sense of vulnerability, introspection, and courage that few other researchers would dare.

Based on extensive qualitative research, Dr. Brown develops three steps to learn from failure, which she calls the Reckoning, the Rumble, and the Revolution. Here’s her explanation.

The Reckoning

The Reckoning means reckoning with our emotions when we fail. We must recognize and acknowledge our emotions, rather than denying them. It doesn’t help to offload them by acting out, shutting down, or getting hamstrung by shame.

To recognize our emotions associated with failure, we must get curious. This is difficult because it takes vulnerability and uncertainty to get curious about ourselves. It’s much easier to get defensive, act superior, numb out, or overreact and fire off that email we’ll regret later. It’s a brave act to acknowledge our feelings rather than deny them.

The Rumble

The Rumble means rumbling with our story. An informal definition of rumble is to take part in a street fight, so the word implies an element of struggle and danger. We all make up stories about our struggles based on incomplete information. It’s important that we reality-check our stories. When we rumble with our story, we move from our first knee-jerk responses and seek a deeper understanding of our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors about who we are and how we engage with others.

First, Dr. Brown recommends that we identify the story we make up by writing out what she calls a “sh***y first draft” (SFD). She cites research by Dr. James Pennebaker about the value of writing down our thoughts and feelings in order to organize the experience. It’s important that we don’t filter the experience or worry about how our story makes us look. We search for the hidden story we’re telling ourselves about our emotions.

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After we identify the story we’re making up with our SFD, it’s time to probe our assumptions, which are usually self-defeating. Dr. Brown recommends asking ourselves other questions:

“What do I know objectively?”

“What more do I need to learn and understand about the other people in the story?”

“What more do I need to learn and understand about myself?”

Then we can look for the difference—the delta—between the story we make up and a more objective truth.

The Revolution

The Revolution is about using the Rising Strong process to create revolutionary, rather than incremental transformation by making it a daily practice and way of engaging with the world. Dr. Brown stresses that it starts with a “vision that we can rise from our experiences of hurt and struggle in a way that allows us to live more wholehearted lives. However, transforming the way we live, love, parent, and work requires us to act on our vision.”

Dr. Brown continues, “We know that rumbling is going to be tough, but we head straight into it because we know running is harder. We wade into the brackish delta with open hearts and minds because we’ve come to learn that the wisdom in the stories of our falls makes us braver.”

Rising Strong by Brené Brown
Tribune Online

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The Dip by Seth Godin https://tribuneonlineng.com/the-dip-by-seth-godin/ Mon, 02 Sep 2019 02:54:34 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=240730 Tribune Online
The Dip by Seth Godin

Dip

Every new thing that you start is usually fun and exciting. But, then it gets harder and becomes less fun. You start to lose motivation and you get into a dip. The dip can get better if you start pushing or a cul-de-sac: something that will never get better no matter how hard you try. […]

The Dip by Seth Godin
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
The Dip by Seth Godin

Dip

Every new thing that you start is usually fun and exciting. But, then it gets harder and becomes less fun. You start to lose motivation and you get into a dip. The dip can get better if you start pushing or a cul-de-sac: something that will never get better no matter how hard you try. In ‘The Dip’, Seth Godin explains when to quit and when to keep pushing forward.

You can deal with obstacles by persevering. By still putting in the work, even though you do not feel like it. Sometimes we get discouraged and look for inspiration or motivation. Seth Godin cited a writing of Vince Lombardi in his book: “Quitters never win and winners never quit”.

Read that quote again. What do you think about it? Seth Godin thinks it is bad advice. According to Seth Godin, winners quit all the time. They just quit the right stuff at the right time.

In ‘The Dip’, Seth Godin writes that there are two curves that define almost any type of situation facing you as you try to accomplish something. Understanding these two curves, and the different type of situations which can lead you to quit, is the first step forward to getting what you want.

The first curve: The dip

Almost every situation in life worth doing is controlled by the Dip. When you start something off, it is fun and exciting. A new process, which can be everything. It can be writing your first book, starting a new sport, staring a new course. The people around you encourage it and you feel motivated.

The first few days, weeks, you grow rapidly. The process is new and you can learn and apply a lot of things. Your progression is solid. Whatever your new process is, it is easy to stay engaged in it.

However, that slows down. And then the dip happens. The dip is the long slog between starting and mastery. The dip is the difference between the ‘easy’ beginner technique and the more useful ‘expert’ approach. The dip is the long stretch between beginner’s luck and real accomplishment.

It is easy being a CEO. What is hard, is getting there. There is a huge dip along the way. Which is a good thing because the dip creates scarcity. Scarcity is the secret to value. If there was no a dip, there would be no scarcity.

Successful people do not ride the dip out with patience. No. They go all in. When they acknowledge the dip, they go even harder. They fight against it and change the rules as they go. Just because you are in the dip does not mean you have to stay in it and be content. That way the dip lasts longer. Maybe even forever. The real winners go against the dip.

The second curve: The cul-de-sac

This curve is so simple that it needs no explanation. It is a situation where you work and keep working hard, but nothing changes. No matter what you do, there is no improvement. It does not get a lot better and it does not get a lot worse. It just is.

The one thing you need to understand about the cul-de-sac, is that it exists. When you realize you are facing one, you need to get out there, quickly. Get off it. A dead end is simply a waste of time. When you find one, you need to quit it because you are wasting away other opportunities.

The third curve: The cliff

Most of the time the first two curves are in force. However, Seth Godin also added a bonus curve, the cliff. The cliff is like a cigarette. It is designed to be almost impossible to quit. The longer you do it, the better it feels to continue.

The same is for the third curve, the cliff. When you work hard at something the pain of quitting just gets bigger and bigger over time. You cannot quit, because you feel like you have invested so much in the situation. Your time, your emotion, maybe even your money. The cliff is a situation where you cannot quit until you fall of, and the whole thing falls apart.

The dip is where success happens. You have probably realized by now that most worthwhile things have a dip which is a good thing, because the dip creates scarcity. The people who go all in on the dip and work through it, are the ones who become the best in their field. They are the ones that go above and beyond everyone else. They do not try to achieve something slightly above average, they try to achieve world-class status through embracing the dip and going all in.

On the other hand, the cul-de-sac and the cliff are the curves that lead to failure. You need to recognize them. Quit them early.

Quit the wrong stuff. Stick with the right stuff. Have the guts to do one or the other.

The Dip by Seth Godin
Tribune Online

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Who Moved My Cheese? https://tribuneonlineng.com/who-moved-my-cheese-2/ Mon, 26 Aug 2019 02:24:37 +0000 https://tribuneonlineng.com/?p=238120 Tribune Online
Who Moved My Cheese?

Cheese

Who Moved My Cheese? By Kenneth Blanchard and Spencer Johnson is a small book arranged in three parts: a fable wrapped between two made-up conversations. The story is simple. Once, long ago and far away, there lived four little characters who ran through a maze looking for cheese. Two; Sniff and Scurry, were mice. The […]

Who Moved My Cheese?
Tribune Online

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Tribune Online
Who Moved My Cheese?

Cheese

Who Moved My Cheese? By Kenneth Blanchard and Spencer Johnson is a small book arranged in three parts: a fable wrapped between two made-up conversations.

The story is simple. Once, long ago and far away, there lived four little characters who ran through a maze looking for cheese. Two; Sniff and Scurry, were mice. The other two; Hem and Haw, were little people. Each eventually found his favorite type of cheese at the end of Cheese Station C. When the cheese supply ran out, Sniff and Scurry went right into action looking for new cheese, because they had never abandoned their animal instincts. Hem and Haw, in contrast, waited around at Station C, complaining about their bad luck.

Sniff and Scurry finally found new cheese, but Hem and Haw stayed put in Station C hoping something would change. Finally Haw realized how ridiculous his behavior had been and left Hem alone in order to search for new cheese. For a long while, he had no success. Sometimes, he doubted he would ever find it. But then one day, when he had wandered far into an unfamiliar part of the maze, he came upon new cheese again.

Like any good fable, “Who Moved My Cheese? can be read in many ways. However you read it, one idea stands out: To be successful in life, you have to keep moving.

That’s not a very popular idea. Most people want to do as little moving as possible. They show up for work and then . . . well . . . not much happens. It’s as if they think life is a contest and he who gets away with doing the least wins.

I do think life gives us two choices. We can get through it doing as little as possible. Or we can work hard and try to build something.

Who Moved My Cheese? posits a world where success and happiness are the byproducts of work. When it comes to making money, building business, and creating wealth, prosperity, and value nothing works like work.

Who Moved My Cheese? reminds us that we can’t stop moving. That we must always be pushing, always be trying new things, and always be ready to change.

Businesses that stagnate will degenerate. Businesspeople who don’t keep moving will eventually fail. Think of yourself as a shark. If you stop going forward, you die. Yet, so many businesspeople find a limited amount of success and then stop.

It doesn’t matter what you do, whether you own a business or work for one and it doesn’t matter what industry you are in. Unless you keep moving and changing, you will fall behind.

Something You Can Promise Yourself . . .

 

Don’t be satisfied with your product/service. However good it is, there is some way to make it better. Speak to your customers. Consult with experts. Examine it yourself. Find some way to improve it. And when you are done, do it again.

Do the same thing with your marketing. Create a successful promotion. Then the moment you know it’s working, start looking for another one to replace it. Spend the money. Devote the time. Believe that the end is nearer than you expect. It usually is.

And with your business plan, expect change too. Anticipate that your customers will change. They will become richer or poorer, older or younger, smarter or dumber, cooler or lamer. Know that your employees will change too. They will move or quit, become disenchanted or enchanted elsewhere. Same thing with your vendors, consultants, and colleagues.

Expect change. Welcome change. Don’t ever stop changing.

This is the process that leads to finding new cheese:

  1. Smell the cheese often, so you know when it’s getting old.
  2. When you move beyond your fear, you feel free.
  3. The quicker you let go of the old cheese, the sooner you find new cheese.
  4. It is safer to search in the maze than to remain in a cheeseless situation.
  5. Move with the cheese and enjoy it.

Who Moved My Cheese?
Tribune Online

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